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Thylacine / Tasmanian Tiger
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Old 12-02-2008, 06:03 AM
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The Thylacine (pronounced /ˈθaɪləsaɪn, -iːn/) (Thylacinus cynocephalus,Greek: dog-headed pouched one) was the largest known carnivorous marsupial of modern times. Native to Australia and New Guinea, it is thought to have become extinct in the 20th century. It is commonly known as the Tasmanian Tiger (because of its striped back), the Tasmanian Wolf, and colloquially the Tassie (or Tazzy) Tiger or simply the Tiger. It was the last extant member of its genus, Thylacinus, although several related species have been found in the fossil record dating back to the early Miocene.

The Thylacine became extinct on the Australian mainland thousands of years before European settlement of the continent, but it survived on the island of Tasmania along with several endemic species, including the Tasmanian Devil. Intensive hunting encouraged by bounties is generally blamed for its extinction, but other contributory factors may have been disease, the introduction of dogs, and human encroachment into its habitat. Despite being officially classified as extinct, sightings are still reported.
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Old 12-02-2008, 09:57 AM
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damn, that thing is scary as shit looking!
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Old 12-02-2008, 12:38 PM
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The last one of them died like 1937 or something.
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Old 12-02-2008, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Axel View Post
The last one of them died like 1937 or something.
Yeah the last one was called Benjamin, I just checked it out, it died on 7 September 1936. Even though it was called Benjamin it was never confirmed if it was Male or Female.

2 pictures of Benjamin shortly after it was captured in 1933 enclosed.


thylacine is one of the creatures that got me interested in cryptozoology
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Old 03-02-2009, 12:50 PM
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Droppings may shed light on tigers mystery
Deborah Smith
February 26, 2009


COULD the Tasmanian tiger have survived beyond the 1930s? Dr Jeremy Austin, deputy director of the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA at the University of Adelaide, is searching for evidence it did.

He has tested animal droppings, or skats, found in Tasmania in the 1950s and 1960s by a thylacine expert Eric Guiler, preserved at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery.

None have yet been found to contain any thylacine DNA. But other remains that post date the extinction of the marsupials could still be uncovered, Austin says.

"Something may turn up in an unlabelled box in a museum - a skat sample or hair sample."

Thylacines were common in Tasmania when Europeans arrived in the early 1800s. The last one killed in the wild was destroyed in 1918, and the last one in captivity died in 1936 in Hobart Zoo.

Austin and his colleagues have been testing DNA from the ancient remains of thylacines and Tasmanian devils found on the mainland to understand why they disappeared here.

The main theory is that the arrival of dingoes from the north 3500 years ago led to the demise of the two native carnivorous animals. "The dingo won out," Austin says.

Dingoes never reached Tasmania, which lends support to this idea. On the other hand, a decline in genetic diversity of the animals may have made them less able to adapt to climate change, and ancient DNA studies could help reveal if this was the case.


Source: Droppings may shed light on tigers mystery | smh.com.au

I've also attached another Thylacine video showing it feeding
Test
.

Picture and Video Clip Stats.
File Type: mp4 Thylacine.mp4 (626.7 KB , 642 views)
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Old 03-02-2009, 01:28 PM
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Tasmania: The great thylacine cover-up.
Michael Cohen

Tasmania, isle of spectacular beauty and unspeakable past crimes spoken of only in whispers. Colonised by the British in early 1800’s Tasmania was to be the final destination point for convicts who had committed the worst crimes. Within decades of the English arriving the Aboriginal population had been reduced from thousands to a dozen, brutally butchered into virtual non-existence, often victims of deliberate and calculated attempts at genocide. Native children were hunted for sport; the women were raped and taken as slaves.
At Port Arthur, convicts were tortured in underground dungeons and it is said that their tormented ghosts still wail at night. Many committed murder just to be hung and forever leave this prison of horrors .... only to be buried in the nearby Island of the Dead, never really escaping this land of bushrangers and cannibal convicts.
Another victim of this brutal colonialism was the beautiful creature known as the thylacine or Tasmanian tiger, a large and slender dog-like marsupial allegedly hunted to extinction. In 1936 ‘Benjamin’ a captured thylacine died a lonely death in the Hobart zoo. It was said that Benjamin was the last thylacine alive……but was he?
Since then there have been thousands of sightings, some highly credible. In 1982 a researcher working for the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service claimed to have seen a ‘Tiger’. In 1995 another employee of the same department made similar claims. In 2005 a German tourist took photos that clearly show a thylacine: Some claim these are forgeries, others are convinced they are proof of this creatures continued yet precarious existence.
It is said that many local Tasmanian’s have seen the creatures but are too afraid to report their sightings. Powerful logging companies are said to be the real rulers of the island, some going back many generations. One in particular, Gunn’s, provokes fear in the hearts of Tasmania’s citizens with the mere mention of its name.
It is said that if you cross the path of Gunn’s and others like it you better sleep with one eye open and a rifle under your bed. Bearded logger-thugs in flannelled shirts might well pay you a visit at 2am in the morning. It is believed that if the Tasmanian tiger is discovered to be alive international pressure will force Tasmania to halt some of the most environmentally destructive logging operations on the planet. Some say logging companies in Tasmania lay down lethal poison before they log any area so as not to be seen as harming native fauna.
Tasmania’s government, rumoured to be in the pocket of loggers, dares not take any sightings seriously.
Some will continue to believe that in mists of Tasmania’s vast rainforests a few tigers still hide. On Bruny Island, near Hobart, many have sworn they have heard giggling and talking in native tongue, some claim they have even seen naked Tasmanian Aboriginals happily diving for shellfish out of the corner of an eye. Perhaps these tiger sightings are just ghosts forever haunting Tasmania's residents, reminding them of their horrific and violent past.

source: All News Web - Tasmania: The great thylacine cover-up.
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Old 03-02-2009, 01:29 PM
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CANBERRA, March 2 (Reuters) - A German tourist who claims to have photographed a Tasmanian tiger, solving one of Australia's enduring wildlife myths, said on Friday he had returned to the country to video the animal and end doubts over his find.

The Tasmanian Tiger, or Thylacine, was a striped, wolf-like native mammal which was hunted to extinction by European settlers. The last one died in a zoo in 1936.

But stories of surviving animals persist and yearly unconfirmed sightings have turned the tiger, whose scientific name means pouched dog with a wolf's head, into a holy grail for mystery hunters from across the globe.

In February 2005, German tourists Klaus Emmerichs and Birgit Jansen said they had captured two digital photos of the animal in Tasmania's rugged forests while on holiday.

"I came from high, and he can't see me. He had his nose down and was snuffing," Emmerichs said on Friday.

"I want to prove that it is not extinct, like the people think and the world thinks," Emmerichs told Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio.

The couple, he said, had no idea the tiger drinking at a creek was extinct and the animal just loped away.

Experts initially believed the night photos showed portions of a Thylacine obscured by foliage, but later examinations led to accusations of a set-up, ending a bid to sell the pictures for A$25,000 ($19,600).

Emmerichs said he had returned to Tasmania, joining up with long-time tiger believer Paul Bailey, to capture the elusive animal on video. Bailey said he saw a tiger in 1967.

"I'm convinced that they are still here," Bailey said.
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Old 03-02-2009, 01:32 PM
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A Tassie tiger? It's the $3m question
By Richard Macey
March 26, 2005



Is this a $3 million marsupial? With Tasmanian tiger fever reaching boiling point over mysterious pictures snapped by a German tourist, the bounty on the striped creature's back soared this week.

A Tasmanian businessman has offered $1.75 million for proof an animal presumed extinct for 70 years is alive and well, and The Bulletin magazine $1.25 million.

The millions have Nick Mooney, a Tasmanian wildlife officer, alarmed. He believes the rewards not only threaten any thylacines clinging to survival, but native wildlife as well.

Earlier this year, Mr Mooney and the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery's director, Bill Bleathman, were shown two digital images, said to have been taken by a German touring Tasmania.

Mr Mooney hears of thylacine sightings "about 10 times a year" but both men agreed the snaps probably did show a partially obscured Tasmanian tiger. Neither, however, was willing to say the pictures were genuine.

Even this newspaper cannot say beyond a doubt that the pictures are of a live animal. The Herald and its sister paper, The Age, ran extensive tests on the pictures after being offered them three weeks ago. These included an examination by thylacine experts and an independent photographic specialist but the results did not conclusively show a live tiger, and we declined to buy the pictures.

The tourist took them on February 3 while driving through Tasmania's rugged central highlands with his girlfriend.

As evening approached they turned off the main road, and found somewhere to park for the night. He grabbed a bottle, put his camera bag around his neck, and set out looking for water. Not far into the bush he spotted a striped animal.

As the animal approached, he snapped twice. It then vanished and he he dashed back to tell his girlfriend. They returned to the spot but the creature was nowhere to be found.

The man's brother, who lives in Victoria, arranged through a journalist on The Age to show the pictures to Mr Mooney and Mr Bleathman.

"One," Mr Bleathman said later, "was very badly out of focus." The other, also blurred, revealed an animal partially obscured behind a log, 15 or 20 metres away. But a tail, and those distinctive stripes were clearly visible in the frame.

He described the thylacine evidence as "inconclusive", but cautiously added that without analysis from photographic experts "we can't rule it out".

Mr Mooney, who is a wildlife biologist with Tasmania's Department of Primary Industries, now will not comment on the pictures until the tourist hands them over for a detailed forensic analysis. They are still in the possession of the owner.

Robert Paddle, author of The Last Tasmanian Tiger, estimates there have been up to 4000 sightings since the animal became extinct, mostly by "people who are profoundly mistaken, or disturbed, or malicious".

After inspecting the pictures this week, the Herald's photographic managing editor, Mike Bowers, conducted his own experiments. First he copied a black and white photograph of a thylacine with its mouth wide open, in Hobart Zoo, taken in the 1930s. Using a colour picture of a thylacine pelt, sold at auction a few years ago, as a guide, Herald imaging specialists then coloured the photo.

"I blew up the picture, as big as I could, probably to a quarter the size of a real Tasmanian tiger. I then cut it out with a Stanley knife," Bowers said. "I stuck it in a tree fern in my front garden."

He photographed his cut-out, trying to produce a blur similar to that in the tourist's image by setting the camera out of focus.

"And I used a very slow shutter speed to blur it a bit more. I shot it at one-tenth of a second and purposely moved my hand as I shot it to blur it further."

This renewed interest in the thylacines has started a gold rush. The Bulletin promises its prize for anyone producing a living Tasmanian tiger before 5pm on June 30. Mr Mooney is confident no one will claim the bounty before the deadline.

Under the rules, which the magazine's editor-in-chief, Garry Linnell, described as "strict and unbending" only one thylacine per entry can be submitted.

It must be "alive and unharmed", a pure-breed, an adult, and "must be naturally conceived and not have been genetically engineered". And "the animal must not have been in captivity at the time the promotion commenced", ruling out any pets.

However, Mr Mooney said the requirement that entrants must "obey all laws ... that require permits, approvals or authorisations" needed to obtain a thylacine provided the real glitch for those after The Bulletin's money.

"We won't be issuing any permits," he said. "We have to draw a clear line between the welfare of the animal and public curiosity. Its welfare comes first."

Mr Mooney fears the millions on offer will start an international stampede that will threaten not only Tasmanian tigers but other native animals.

"The risk of trying to catch a thylacine is immense," he said. "I see no excuse for catching it. It would be completely unethical."

Several animals known to have been trapped died suddenly from the shock and a huge hunt would inevitably involve traps and hurt native species. Mr Mooney said although the species was presumed extinct it was "still wholly protected" under the law.

And to collect the $1.75 million offered by Thylacine Expeditions the person discovering the living Tasmanian tiger must be a customer on its tours. The owner, Stewart Malcolm, conducts tours of Tasmania's north-west, where the creature is said to roam.

His brother and business partner, Stewart, gave the game away. "It's a promotion.

Source: A Tassie tiger? It's the $3m question - National - www.smh.com.au
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Old 03-06-2009, 08:27 PM
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I hope the thylacine is still around somewhere. They are really beautiful and interesting creatures. The really sucky thing about finding that they still exist is how the only indisputable proof there could be is if someone kills one and the body is studied and tested.
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Old 03-07-2009, 02:33 AM
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Originally Posted by dooflotchie View Post
I hope the thylacine is still around somewhere. They are really beautiful and interesting creatures. The really sucky thing about finding that they still exist is how the only indisputable proof there could be is if someone kills one and the body is studied and tested.
yeah, from all the cryptozoological creatures the thylacine is the one creature I would love to be able to see with my own eyes! I find this creature absolutely fascinating, I wouldnt be surprised if they were indeed still around, just like the coelacanth
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