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MoD Admits Vets Routinely Putting Down Physically Healthy War Horses 

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Old 01-20-2012, 07:15 PM
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MoD Admits Vets Routinely Putting Down Physically Healthy War Horses

Quote:
The MoD was under fire from animal rights groups today after admitting that it put down healthy horses simply for having a ‘bad temperament’.
As Steven Spielberg's smash-hit film War Horse takes the country by storm, equine charity HorseWorld has written to the MoD to raise concerns that these brave beasts may be being needlessly destroyed.
Figures released by the department showed that 28 army horses were put down last year – 16 more than in 2009.

Shockingly, four of those destroyed in 2011 were euthanised not because of physical health problems but because of their ‘temperament’.
The practice is clearly not a new one, as 2009 saw three horses killed on these grounds.
The statistics emerged in a written parliamentary answer from Defence Minister Andrew Robathan in response to a question from Labour MP Kevan Jones.

HorseWorld equine welfare director Jerry Watkins said: ‘Alternatives to euthanasia always need to be properly considered when an animal reaches the end of its working life.
‘We have no reason to believe the MoD is not following correct principles and practices, but the public will want to be assured that in each case every alternative was considered, and will be in future.
‘Publication of case notes of the animals that were put down due to temperament could help provide this reassurance, or the MoD may have other ways of doing so which makes things more transparent.'

Of the army horses destroyed in 2011 because of their physical complaints, ten were put down due to lameness, seven for colic, three for injury, three for brain problems and one for cancer.
In 2009, when nine horses were put down due to ailments, eight were suffering from lameness, and one was injured.
Among the animals that HorseWorld has looked after in the past decade is former army horse Mountjoy, who was retired to the charity's rehabilitation centre in 2003.
During his military career Mountjoy was the charger of Lieutenant Colonel Crispin Lockhart -now Commanding Officer of the Household Cavalry - when he was a squadron leader.

Mountjoy:


Mountjoy died in 2008 after five years at the centre, including a period where he was rehomed with a horse loaner.
A MoD spokesman said: ‘Our animals play an invaluable role on military operations in Afghanistan and elsewhere and are much loved by the troops.
‘Healthy animals are re-homed.
‘However, due to the challenging nature of their work, a small minority of our horses sometimes get injured or contract illnesses that sadly result in them needing to be put down.’
He stressed that only a ‘small minority’ of animals needed to be euthanised.
HorseWorld is currently responsible for over 140 horses, ponies and donkeys at its Whitchurch site and for a further 300 who have been successfully re-homed by people who care for them on a loan basis.


Just received this response from someone that works with The Horse Trust (-chris)
Quote:
The Horse Trust Gives Sanctuary to 21st Century War Horses

26 January 2012: The recent release of the Steven Spielberg film “War Horse” has prompted some to ask the question, what happens to the horses serving in the British Army in the 21st century when their working days are over? Whilst many are re-homed to private owners a number of these modern day War Horses are given lifelong sanctuary at The Horse Trust.

The charity specialises in providing retirement and respite to horses and ponies that have served their country or community in the armed forces, the Police service or for charities working with disabled and disadvantaged youngsters. It is a sad fact of life that for some animals re-homing or retirement is not an option due to injury, illness or very occasionally because of a behavioural problem that is serious enough to make the animal a danger to itself or its human owners.

Horses are only put down by the Army as a final resort when it is certain they have absolutely no prospect of a pain free or happy, safe and secure future; those that can enjoy a peaceful retirement receive it with either with new owners or at The Horse Trust.

Retirement today

The Ministry of Defence Animal Centre (DAC), Melton Mowbray, the epicentre for the training and management of animals used in Defence, works in close association with The Horse Trust, which relies on public donations, to ensure the retirement needs of military horses are met in the most suitable way for each individual animal’s needs.

Amongst the former Army horses retired to The Horse Trust are 26 year old Sevastopol, a striking grey ex-trumpeter with the Blues and Royals, Hapsburg a 19yr old bay gelding from the Kings Troop Royal Artillery and Auriol, a ‘Cavalry Black’, recently loaned to the Honourable Artillery Company‘s Light Cavalry having recovered from concussion laminitis.

His old work on London’s streets was aggravating his condition while his new role will be less demanding and mainly on soft surfaces. When Auriol is no longer able or happy in this work he will retire permanently back to The Horse Trust. The Riding Master of the Light Cavalry, Charles Gillow, commented ”It has been a privilege to give Auriol an opportunity to continue his working career in a familiar role, with less street work, and regular exercise in Windsor Great Park.

It has been reassuring to the Light Cavalry to know that the Horse Trust is ready to look after our retirees when they can no longer handle the work. Currently, we have three ex-Light Cavalry horses enjoying their retirement at the Horse Trust”.

Click for a high resolution photo of Auriol at his official hand over from the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment to The Horse Trust in 2011

One of the ex-army residents of The Horse Trust is former King’s Troop Charger Rocket Ron, a perfect example of how the DAC and The Horse Trust collaborate to secure the most suitable future for horses with very individual needs. Ron started out with the King’s Troop but never settled on parade and so was moved to the DAC centre at Melton Mowbray where he became an invaluable training horse, helping soldiers learn to ride and also training those becoming Army riding instructors.

Sadly, he developed chronic girth galls, a condition that strikes when a horse has particularly sensitive skin and being ridden for long periods became too painful for him. Being only 14, The Horse Trust initially tried loaning Rocket Ron to a private home. However he displayed some highly institutionalised behaviour that made him a potential danger in a very small yard. Back at The Horse Trust, Ron is extremely happy and settled in a larger environment with many more horses surrounding him and his training skills are now being put to great use helping

The Horse Trust train young rescue horses and ponies, helping the charity to secure the best possible loan homes for the youngsters.

CEO of the Horse Trust, Jeanette Allen said, “Rocket Ron is a prime example of an ex-army horse that requires a very specific retirement environment. He is now not only happily settled but is able to do light part time work leading young animals venturing onto roads for the first time.

He may have never liked parades but out and about he is an absolute dream giving young ponies that have suffered extreme cruelty and neglect, including three from the notorious Spindles Farm case, the confidence to become beloved riding ponies in the future.”

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Old 01-20-2012, 07:16 PM
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Re: MoD Admits Vets Routinely Put Down Physically Healthy War Horses

Just wanted to say anyone who hasn't seen War Horse should, fantastic film

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Old 01-21-2012, 07:46 PM
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Re: MoD Admits Vets Routinely Put Down Physically Healthy War Horses

now we can eat horse meat thanks to obama

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Old 01-26-2012, 04:16 PM
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Re: MoD Admits Vets Routinely Putting Down Physically Healthy War Horses

I just added a response to this post that was emailed to me from The Horse Trust people.

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Old 01-26-2012, 11:43 PM
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Re: MoD Admits Vets Routinely Putting Down Physically Healthy War Horses

This is a very interesting article. These horses don't really lead a "normal" horse's life, so I can understand why some of these horses mentally go "'round the bend". The Horse Trust genuinely cares about the horses under their care, but the truth is there just aren't enough qualified homes to accept them.

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