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Wildfires in Colorado, New Mexico Force Hundreds to Evacuate 

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Old 06-11-2012, 05:13 PM
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Wildfires in Colorado, New Mexico Force Hundreds to Evacuate

I hope LadyPox is alright

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Firefighters in New Mexico and Colorado are battling wildfires that have spread quickly in all directions, forcing hundreds of people to flee from their homes across both states.

In Colorado, at least 18 structures, including homes, have been destroyed, while one person is missing and feared dead, according to authorities. Flames have torched more than 30 square miles in two days.

"If you talk about worst-case scenario, this is our worst-case scenario," Larimer County Sheriff Justin Smith said.

Hundreds of residents have been evacuated. Authorities sent at least 2,575 evacuation notices to phone numbers but it wasn't clear how many residents had to leave, according to ABC News Station KMGH-TV in Denver. About 500 people had checked in at Red Cross shelters, according to The Associated Press.

Some residents said they didn't receive any notice and their only warning was hearing the fire coming toward their doorsteps.


AP Photo/Roswell Daily Record, Mark Wilson
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"It was terrible. It sounded like a hurricane," said Sandra Mullen, according to KMGH. "I think everything will be gone. My husband is 78 and I'm 75, so when you're that old, it's too hard to start over."

Resident Joanne Hertz said, "It looked like Armageddon. I have absolutely no clue if my house is still standing."

Resources are spread thin in Larimer County as other western states need tankers, helicopters and ground crews to battle their own wildfires, sheriff's spokesman Nick Christensen told KMGH.

Chief Tom Demint of the Poudre Fire Authority said, "We have thousands of acres of fire, hundreds of homes threatened, and dozens of fire engine."

In New Mexico, a destructive fire near Ruidoso tripled in size this weekend and destroyed 40 buildings. Dan Ware, a spokesman for the New Mexico State Forestry Division, said evacuees were in the hundreds, but he didn't have an exact figure, according to The Associated Press.

Strong winds, meanwhile, grounded aircraft fighting the wildfire in Ruidoso, according to The Associated Press. Crews were working to build a fire line around the blaze, which started Friday.

"My faith is so deep that I know that whatever happens, it's not that it's God's fault," said Brenda Garber, who lost her home in New Mexico.

Elsewhere Sunday, firefighters were battling a wildfire that blackened 6 square miles in Wyoming's Guernsey State Park and forced the evacuation of between 500 and 1,000 campers and visitors, according to The Associated Press.

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Old 06-12-2012, 07:37 AM
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Re: Wildfires in Colorado, New Mexico Force Hundreds to Evacuate

It seems it's getting worse and worse

Wildfires in Colo., NM burn out of control
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BELLVUE, Colo. – As darkness fell over a 64-square-mile wildfire that has left one person dead and damaged more than 100 structures in northern Colorado, flames that were largely obscured during the day by a grayish-brown haze of smoke stood out along a fire line that crept along the side of the charred foothills.

Unable to return home, evacuee Cy Johnson set up a stand in the back of a pickup truck to hand out water and sandwiches to fire crews. "You're doing something. At least you're doing something," he said.

Massive wildfires in drought-parched Colorado and New Mexico tested the resources of state and federal crews Monday.

Wyoming diverted personnel and aircraft from two fires there to help with the Colorado fire, and Canada lent two aerial bombers following the recent crash of a U.S. tanker in Utah. An elite federal firefighting crew also arrived to try to begin containing a fire that destroyed at least 118 structures.

All told, about 600 firefighters will be battling the fire some 15 miles west of Fort Collins by Tuesday, said incident commander Bill Hahnenberg.

"We are a very high priority nationally. We can get all the resources we want and need," he said.

The U.S. Forest Service said late Monday it would add more aircraft to its aerial firefighting fleet, contracting one air tanker from Alaska and four from Canada. Two more air tankers were being activated in California.

The announcement came after Colorado's U.S. House delegation demanded that the agency deploy more resources to the fire, which has forced hundreds of people to abandon their homes.

The Larimer County sheriff's office confirmed Monday that one person died in the fire.

The family of Linda Steadman, 62, had reported her missing after the fire started Saturday, sheriff's officials said. Her home received two evacuation notices that appeared to go to her answering machine, and a firefighter who tried to get past a locked gate to her home to warn her was chased out by flames that he later saw engulf her home, Sheriff Justin Smith said.

Investigators found remains in her burned home Monday that haven't been positively identified yet, but her family issued a statement saying Steadman died in the cabin she loved, Smith said.

In a letter to the Forest Service, Colorado's congressional delegation said the need for firefighting aircraft was "dire." U.S. Sen. Mark Udall urged President Barack Obama to sign legislation that would allow the Forest Service to contract at least seven large air tankers to add to its fleet of 13 — which includes the two on loan from Canada.

The temporary additions to the firefighting aircraft fleet will make 17 air tankers available to the forest service, which has deployed 10 air tankers, 62 helicopters and 4,000 personnel to more than 100 fires nationwide.

One of the region's most potent aerial firefighting forces — two Wyoming Air National Guard C-130s fitted to drop slurry — sat on a runway in Cheyenne, 50 miles north of the Colorado fire. The reason: The Forest Service, by law, cannot call for military resources until it deems that its fleet is fully busy. It also takes 36 hours to mobilize the crews and planes, officials said.

"They just haven't thrown the switch yet because they feel like there are adequate resources available," said Mike Ferris of the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho.

Evacuees expressed gratitude for the help.

"They're doing the best they can," said Barb Hermsen as she watched a helicopter make daring raids through smoke and flame to protect homes. "We know how much they have to go through, and where they're going — man, it's crazy."

In New Mexico, firefighters used a break in the hot and windy weather and got new air and ground support to battle a fast-moving wildfire that charred tens of thousands of acres and forced hundreds of residents to leave their homes in the southern part of the state.

The lightning-sparked fire in the Sierra Blanca mountain range reached more than 54 square miles by Monday.

An estimated 35 structures have been damaged or destroyed by the blaze, and fire managers expect that number to grow once damage assessments are done.

Elsewhere in New Mexico, firefighters made slow progress against the largest wildfire in state history. The blaze has charred 435 square miles of forest since it was sparked by lightning in mid-May, and was 37 percent contained Monday.

Arizona's state forestry division dispatched two water tenders and 15 fire trucks to New Mexico, which also welcomed the arrival of a DC-10 jet that can lay a 100-yard-wide, mile-long line of retardant or water.

Fire bosses in New Mexico and Arizona ordered more elite crews, engines and air support from the Southwest Coordination Center in Albuquerque, where director Kenan Jaycox said resources are approaching full capacity.

"It's a balancing game," Jaycox said.

At least 18 large wildfires are burning in nine U.S. states. The National Interagency Fire Center said 4,000 of 15,000 federal firefighters are deployed at fires around the country.

Because aircraft had been scarce, federal fire managers asked Wyoming to send National Guard helicopters to a 4.5-square-mile wildfire in Guernsey State Park. In nearby Medicine Bow National Forest, crews containing a 13-square-mile fire sent air support to Colorado.

Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell has long insisted the federal government has enough resources to respond to a year-round wildfire season driven by drought, heat, decades of fighting forest fires rather than letting them run their natural course, and bark beetle-killed trees.

He said the agency has the authority to transfer funds from other accounts to meet firefighting costs.

Some 1,459 square miles have burned across the country this year — less than the same period in 2011, when 6,327 square miles burned.
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/06/12...#ixzz1xZaFSp00
Interactive wildfire map

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Old 06-12-2012, 06:44 PM
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Re: Wildfires in Colorado, New Mexico Force Hundreds to Evacuate

I'm not too knowledgable on where things are at out that way. How close to Denver is it? My father-in-law lives near Denver, and I can't always just call him up and ask.

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Old 06-12-2012, 06:51 PM
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Re: Wildfires in Colorado, New Mexico Force Hundreds to Evacuate

What a terrifying situation. Hope it doesn't claim any more lives or injure many. I can't imagine that. We can get constant rain and flooding in some parts of the country, but a wildfire? Now that is scary :( Luckily we haven't had anything other than field fires caused by daft kids.

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Old 06-12-2012, 07:10 PM
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Re: Wildfires in Colorado, New Mexico Force Hundreds to Evacuate

Colorado fire update: 2 fatalities; 16 structures burn;
fire map

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Originally Posted by AnneLea View Post
I'm not too knowledgable on where things are at out that way. How close to Denver is it? My father-in-law lives near Denver, and I can't always just call him up and ask.
Denver should be safe; (top right, above Aurora).



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Old 06-14-2012, 02:06 PM
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Re: Wildfires in Colorado, New Mexico Force Hundreds to Evacuate

We've had four emergency boards (horses) due to the High Park fire.

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