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Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics 

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Old 08-05-2016, 03:14 PM
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Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

Much has been said about the risks Zika virus presents to tourists and athletes visiting Rio de Janeiro for the Olympics. Several competitors decided to skip the games because of the epidemic. But the fact is, crime is a much bigger threat, and the numbers prove that.

It is winter in the Southern Hemisphere, and the number of reported Zika cases has fallen about 90 percent in comparison to six months ago. Also, researchers at the University of São Paulo have just confirmed previous studies and concluded that only three or four of the expected 500,000 foreign tourists will get sick because of Zika. The same cannot be said of the urban violence in Rio.

Crime rates are surging in Rio—especially in the shanty towns or “favelas” controlled by heavily armed criminal groups. The main concern is burglary and robbery. According to the Brazilian government, there were 98,038 cases of such crimes in the first six months of 2016 in Rio. That average represents more than 3,000 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Worse than that: 31 people were killed this year during robbery attempts.

For the criminals, the games started way before this Friday’s ceremony.


Two men armed with guns robbed an Olympic athlete from the Australian Paralympic team. Criminals stole $400, 000 worth of equipment from a German TV crew. An Australian news team was attacked on the famed Copacabana beach. A Chinese athlete and cameraman had their equipment stolen from their hotel. And a New Zealand athlete didn’t know who to call after being abducted by two armed gunmen dressed in police uniforms, who forced him to withdraw cash from several ATMs.

International visitors are usually the preferred targets of Rio’s criminals. A Brazilian newspaper dove into the statistics and found out that, on average, 15 foreign tourists have been victimized every day since the athlete’s village was opened on July 24.

It is imperative to say Rio is not a lawless land. The city’s official murder rate is at 19.2 per 100,000 inhabitants per year (and going down), comparable to places like Atlanta and Cincinnati—not safe, but far less violent than Detroit and Baltimore, and incomparably better than Caracas, Venezuela, which has the highest global homicide rates.

Also, there is hope that the massive international effort of security forces—including the respected Brazilian police and armed forces—will reduce risks for tourists and athletes.

Rio may not be the best environment for the Olympics, but it could be worse.

Until a few months ago, there was concern about the stability of Brazil, which is still in the midst of political crisis and profound economic recession.


http://www.documentingreality.com/fo...ges/upload.png


Political unrest has been constant in Brazil in the last months, following a corruption scandal that led to massive demonstrations and culminated with the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff. Prospects for the future look promising as the interim president, Michel Temer, is a moderate, unlike his socialist predecessor.

Of course, as with many major international sporting events, there is the threat of terrorism. While there is a massive international effort in place to secure Rio, security will be on high alert for Aug. 5-21.

As The Heritage Foundation scholar and retired Army Green Beret Steve Bucci explained, “Since Palestinian terrorists disrupted the 1972 Munich Games, the Olympics also have meant something else. Every country that wins the opportunity to host the games also has a herculean security challenge. This year is perhaps the most challenging to date.”

So far, Brazil appears to be meeting the challenge. To date, “Brazil already has rounded up 12 terror suspects in multiple operations, all thought to be planning attacks on the Summer Games.”

There is no doubt the Summer Games come at a very difficult time for Brazil, but doomsday predictions are counterproductive. We should celebrate this global sporting event and pray it is a success.
http://dailysignal.com/2016/08/04/fo...olympic-games/

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Waze.app in Brazil to have crime alerts

IN OCTOBER 2015, Regina Múrmura, 70, and her husband, Francisco, 69, followed directions on their Waze navigation app into the Caramujo favela, what news reports called a “violent” Brazilian neighborhood 15 miles outside Rio de Janeiro. As their silver Citroen drove through the unfamiliar area, shots—a hail of them—flew through the car. Regina died at the hospital. Francisco was reportedly saved by a pair of silver candlesticks in the trunk that deflected bullets away from his body.

The death of Regina Múrmura made national headlines, firming up the city’s reputation for violent crime. Waze is about to launch new feature aimed at preventing similar deaths. On Wednesday, just in time for the Olympics, the company will release Crime Risk Alerts in Rio. Here’s how it works: If a user enters an address in one of the 25 areas Waze identifies “high crime,” they’ll see an alert on their screen. “Caution,” it will read, a red exclamation mark hovering above. “This destination is an area with a higher chance of crime.” Users will also get an alert if they happen to drive through one of these areas on their way somewhere else. These locations are areas with higher-than-average homicide, car robbery, or drug trafficking rates. They’ve been identified by data sources, and corroborated by researchers and Waze map editors on the ground.

Waze had already been considering instituting these pop-up alerts for two years when Múrmura died. And though the company says its decision to implement the feature had nothing to do with the incident, Waze says the community of roughly 2,000 Brazilian volunteers who work on fact-checking their local maps had been asking for such a feature. “It is very easy to get turned around in Rio,” says Paulo Cabral, a Brazil native and Waze’s head of Latin American growth. “I understand the anxiety of ending up somewhere you didn’t plan to be.”


WAZE
Still, the application sets off alarm bells. (Sorry.) Homicide rates in the Brazilian city have actually declined since 2007, from 37.8 deaths per 100,000 residents to 18.6, though Waze says they’re up since last year. Waze’s Brazilian users—particularly those who are visiting from nearby cities—may find this feature reassuring. But many “high crime” areas are also poor areas, and some might find it offensive that there’s an app that will steer you and your fancy smartphone away from low-income neighborhoods. Do “Crime Risk Alerts” simply feed anxieties about local crime? Or can they actually keep people safe?

Will It Keep You Safe?
To determine which areas get “high crime” alerts, Waze uses data from Disque Denuncia, a Brazilian phone service that receives and logs crime information from anonymous callers. The app supplements those numbers with data from local universities and researchers. Waze cross-references high-crime areas with places where their Rio users often drive, and throws those out—drivers are clearly comfortable with the level of risk in those areas. 25 “polygons” remain—areas as small as a city block or as large as an entire neighborhood.

The company declined to name the communities it’s labeled as “high crime,” partly out of respect to those who actually live there. If a user does happen to set one of these areas as “home” in her app, she’ll only receive the alert once.

The feature’s ability to protect its users will, of course, depend on the quality of the data powering it. And Disque Denuncia data isn’t perfect, says Nick Barnes, a doctoral candidate in political science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, who works with the service’s dataset regularly. “A lot of people use the Disque Denuncia hotline because it’s anonymous,” Barnes says. He says that means the data mostly reflects crime in Rio’s favelas, where people may be afraid to go on the record with notoriously corrupt police. Many of these places are unquestionably dangerous for outsiders. But especially given Waze’s well-meaning attempt to exclude areas already frequented by its users, it may be discarding places where users can still fall victim to crime. Waze says it makes up for these discrepancies with additional data sources. Still, it’s TBD whether the new feature will prevent crime, or just make drivers feel more secure in their cars.

https://www.wired.com/2016/07/crime-...time-olympics/

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Old 08-05-2016, 06:09 PM
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Re: Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

Waze app?

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Old 08-05-2016, 06:14 PM
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Re: Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

Quote:
Originally Posted by slyksleevemuckyey View Post
Waze app?
https://www.waze.com

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Old 08-05-2016, 06:55 PM
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Re: Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

Would crime alerts be on that though? I've got a feeling they meant whats app.

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Old 08-05-2016, 06:56 PM
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Re: Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

Ah I've just read it again, now I understand lol Sorry.

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Old 08-05-2016, 08:10 PM
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Re: Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

The athletes should get gold medals if they survive the Olympics! Something bad is going to happen.... in a good way for this site! It starts tonight, ready, set, die! Peter Allen sang it best... When my baby, when my baby dies with me then were in Rio, De Manuro, oh my oh pee you.......

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Old 08-05-2016, 09:24 PM
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Re: Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

[quote=slyksleevemuckyey;5304694]Ah I've just read it again, now I understand lol Sorry: endquote

I made it a bit easier to read ..

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Old 08-06-2016, 12:43 AM
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Re: Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

By South American standards not so bad maybe, but still about 5x the murder rate in America.

Honduras has about 3x Brazil's murder rate, think about that for a minute.

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Old 08-06-2016, 12:54 AM
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Re: Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

Rob :
I'm certain that those statistics won't make the athletes feel any safer ...They are only as good as the reporting agency / or not reporting ..

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Old 08-06-2016, 04:26 AM
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Re: Urban Crime @ Brazil Olympics

Personally I have zero interest in the Olympics, but if I did I sure as hell wouldn't be going to Rio to see it. I would feel the need to be armed to the teeth if I felt like going for a beer at night or during the day for that matter. People are actually taking their wife and kids there.

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