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Snow Snarls Flights to Super Bowl 

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Old 02-04-2011, 03:52 PM
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Snow Snarls Flights to Super Bowl


Traffic slows to a crawl on Interstate 30 outside of Dallas on Friday, Feb. 4. The NFL's Super Bowl XLV will be played in the Dallas area on Sunday.
The snow caused 341 inbound flights to be canceled at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport on Friday, according to FlightAware, a website that tracks flights, and it shut down commercial flights at smaller Dallas Love Field. Houston Bush International Airport, meanwhile, saw 384 inbound flights canceled.

It was one last blitz from nature against organizers of the big game, who have struggled all week with ice and freezing temperatures in north Texas.

Airlines were counting on a weather forecast that called for snow to end and temperatures to rise into Saturday.

High-flying fans may still see superbowl.

American Airlines, the dominant carrier at DFW Airport, expected Friday to be the busiest day for travelers attending the Super Bowl between the Green Bay Packers and the Pittsburgh Steelers. By midmorning, American and its regional affiliate, American Eagle, had canceled about half of their flights at DFW — including more than 300 arriving flights through early afternoon.

"We are putting extra effort to operate our flights in from Chicago today to keep the Super Bowl-oriented traffic moving," said Tim Smith, an American Airlines spokesman.

Smith said the airline was also giving more attention to 12 extra flights that it added from Pittsburgh and airports near Green Bay to handle people coming to the game.

**If those flights are canceled, fans could have trouble getting to the game because later flights heading to Dallas from the two teams' regions are virtually full.

Southwest Airlines expected to cancel 60 flights Friday at its home airport of Dallas Love Field, although it wasn't clear whether much of that traffic was Super Bowl-related.

The city-run airport, which was shuttered earlier this week by an ice storm, closed its runways to commercial airliners again on Friday, although private planes continued to operate, said airport spokesman Jose Luis Torres.


"We've cleared one of the runways and we're clearing the taxiways," Torres said. He said Southwest flights were likely to resume by late morning or early afternoon.

Southwest planned to run four extra flights on Friday, with return legs Monday, between Dallas and both Pittsburgh and Milwaukee. It was unclear whether those flights would be affected by Friday's storm.

Visitors who were able to reach the Dallas area encountered icy roads, especially on secondary streets, that made driving hazardous.

Some VIPs have been unimpressed with efforts to deal with the ice and snow. Kurt Warner, a Super Bowl MVP quarterback for the St. Louis Rams, said the region looked unprepared to handle the bad weather

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Old 02-04-2011, 03:55 PM
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Re: Snow Snarls Flights to Super Bowl

Flying during the Super Bowl no longer means waiting for the pilot to announce the latest score.

But if you're hoping to watch the Packers-Steelers matchup at 30,000 feet next Sunday, plan carefully: Not every airline with TV will be showing the game and not all digital alternatives work once regular-season football ends.

JetBlue Airways pioneered satellite TV on commercial airplanes in 2000 and four other U.S. airlines now have it. On airlines without TV, a Wi-Fi Internet connection is the next best thing because it allows you to watch shows live on laptops, iPhones and other devices.
"Today, pilots are more likely to walk into the cabin and see if they can find somebody who has the score," says Rick Seaney, CEO of airfare search site FareCompare.com.

Here's everything you need to know if you're flying next Sunday and don't want to miss Super Bowl XLV:

•JetBlue, Frontier and most Continental planes will carry the game on DirecTV. JetBlue's service is free; Continental and Frontier charge $6.
•Virgin America and Delta Air Lines have free TV. But they carry the DISH Network, which, on planes, doesn't have Fox — the channel broadcasting the game.
•On planes with Wi-Fi, there's only one option: Slingbox, a $180 piece of hardware that connects to a home TV and allows users to watch programming on their laptop, iPad and some smartphones.

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