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Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast 

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Old 03-14-2011, 12:18 AM
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Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast

SOMA, Japan – Soldiers and officials in northeastern Japan are warning residents that the area could be hit by another tsunami and are ordering residents to higher ground.

Sirens around the town of Soma went off late Monday morning and public address systems ordered residents to higher ground.

Kyodo News Agency said the tsunami could be 10 feet (3 meters) high, citing Fukushima prefectural officials.

An Associated Press reporter stood about 100 yards (100 meters) from the coast.

The area was hit by a massive quake and tsunami on Friday.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE.

SENDAI, Japan (AP) — Japan began rolling blackouts to conserve power Monday as it tried desperately to stabilize nuclear reactors at risk of meltdown in the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami. The disasters sent Tokyo's stock market plunging as it opened, raising fears of a steep economic toll on top of the already overwhelming human suffering.

Friday's quake and tsunami, which swallowed towns and tossed large ships like game-board pieces, caused tens of billions of dollars in losses, according to preliminary estimates. And the first day of stock trading since the disasters opening underlined the challenges Japan's already fragile economy will have in bouncing back.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110314/...earthquake_118


FUKUSHIMA, Japan (Reuters) – A hydrogen explosion rocked the earthquake-stricken nuclear plant in Japan where authorities have been working desperately to avert a meltdown, while media said a fresh tsunami was heading for the same coastline that was hit last week.

Japan's nuclear agency confirmed there was an explosion at the No. 3 reactor of the Daiichi plant in Fukushima, and TV images showed smoke rising from the facility, 240 km (150 miles) north of Tokyo.

Officials said they could not immediately confirm whether the blast had caused a radioactive leak.

Operators had earlier halted injection of sea water into the reactor, resulting in a rise in radiation levels and pressure. The government had warned that an explosion was possible because of the buildup of hydrogen in the building housing the reactor.

Japan battled through the weekend to prevent a nuclear catastrophe and to care for the millions without power or water in its worst crisis since World War Two, after a huge earthquake and tsunami that likely killed more than 10,000 people.

A badly wounded nation has seen whole villages and towns wiped off the map by a wall of water, leaving in its wake an international humanitarian effort of epic proportions.

Kyodo quoted authorities as saying the new tsunami could be up to a height of three metres and issued an alert for the country's Pacific coast, including Fukushima prefecture.

Prime Minister Naoto Kan said the situation at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant remained worrisome and that the authorities were doing their utmost to stop damage from spreading.

"The earthquake, tsunami and the nuclear incident have been the biggest crisis Japan has encountered in the 65 years since the end of World War Two," a grim-faced Kan had told a news conference on Sunday.

Officials confirmed on Sunday that three nuclear reactors north of Tokyo were at risk of overheating, raising fears of an uncontrolled radiation leak.

Engineers worked desperately to cool the fuel rods in the damaged reactors. If they fail, the containers that house the core could melt, or even explode, releasing radioactive material into the atmosphere.

The world's third-biggest economy also faced rolling power blackouts to conserve energy, and Tokyo commuters reported long delays as train companies cut back services.

DEATH TOLL "ABOVE 10,000"

Broadcaster NHK, quoting a police official, said more than 10,000 people may have been killed as the wall of water triggered by Friday's 8.9-magnitude quake surged across the coastline, reducing whole towns to rubble. It was the biggest to have hit the quake-prone country since it started keeping records 140 years ago.

Kyodo said 80,000 people had been evacuated from a 20-km (12-mile) radius around the stricken nuclear plant, joining more than 450,000 other evacuees from quake and tsunami-hit areas in the northeast of the main island Honshu.

Almost 2 million households were without power in the freezing north, the government said. There were about 1.4 million without running water.

NUCLEAR CRISIS

The most urgent crisis centres on the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex, where authorities said they had been forced to vent radioactive steam into the air to relieve reactor pressure.

The complex was rocked by a first explosion on Saturday, which blew the roof off a reactor building. The government had said further blasts would not necessarily damage the reactor vessels.

Operator Tokyo Electric Power Co said on Monday it had reported a rise in radiation levels at the complex to the government. On Sunday the level had risen slightly above what one is exposed to for a stomach X-ray, the company said.

Authorities had been pouring sea water in two of the reactors at the complex to cool them down.

Nuclear experts said it was probably the first time in the industry's 57-year history that sea water has been used in this way, a sign of how close Japan may be to a major accident.

"Injection of sea water into a core is an extreme measure," Mark Hibbs of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. "this is not according to the book."

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said there might have been a partial meltdown of the fuel rods at the No. 1 reactor, where Saturday's blast took place, and there was a risk of an explosion at the building housing the No. 3 reactor, but that it was unlikely to affect the reactor core container.

A Japanese official said 22 people have been confirmed to have suffered radiation contamination and up to 190 may have been exposed. Workers in protective clothing used handheld scanners to check people arriving at evacuation centres.

"NOT ANOTHER CHERNOBYL"

The nuclear accident, the worst since Chernobyl in Soviet Ukraine in 1986, sparked criticism that authorities were ill-prepared for such a massive quake and the threat that could pose to the country's nuclear power industry.

Prime Minister Kan on Sunday sought to allay radiation fears: "Radiation has been released in the air, but there are no reports that a large amount was released," Jiji news agency quoted him as saying. "This is fundamentally different from the Chernobyl accident."

ECONOMIC IMPACT

The earthquake has forced many firms to suspend production and shares in some of Japan's biggest companies tumbled on Monday, with Toyota Corp dropping around 7 percent. Shares in Australian-listed uranium miners also dived.

"When we talk about natural disasters, we tend to see an initial sharp drop in production ... then you tend to have a V-shaped rebound. But initially everyone underestimates the damage," said Michala Marcussen, head of global economics at Societe Generale.

Ratings agency Moody's said on Sunday the fiscal impact of the earthquake would be temporary and have a limited play on whether it would downgrade Japan's sovereign debt.

The Bank of Japan has said it would pump cash into the banking system to prevent the disaster from destabilizing markets.

It is also expected to signal its readiness to ease monetary policy further if the damage threatens a fragile economic recovery.

The earthquake was the fifth most powerful to hit the world in the past century. It surpassed the Great Kanto quake of September 1, 1923, which had a magnitude of 7.9 and killed more than 140,000 people in the Tokyo area.

The 1995 Kobe quake killed 6,000 and caused $100 billion in damage, the most expensive natural disaster in history. Economic damage from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was estimated at about $10 billion.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/ts_nm/us_japan_quake

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Old 03-14-2011, 12:27 AM
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Re: Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast

I think the tsunami warning was just a false alarm. I think it's been canceled.

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Old 03-14-2011, 12:28 AM
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Re: Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast

yeah...I saw the conflicting report after I posted this big burly post.

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Old 03-14-2011, 01:42 AM
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Re: Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast

There is still the question of where the water is going after being used as coolant.....straight back into the ocean by the sound of it.

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Old 03-14-2011, 01:54 AM
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Re: Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast

Tht sucks, even if it's a false alarm Japan got fucked. I think it's especially crazy considering they're a first world country.

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Old 03-14-2011, 02:07 AM
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Re: Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast

yeah...I would imagine it is all going back into the sea. I wonder how many more times it's going to blow before they get it under control. All the precautions to keep people from getting exposed and they are saying that 160 people might have been exposed anyway

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Old 03-14-2011, 02:15 AM
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Re: Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast

This is what seafood lovers will be eating in a generation or two...

Your Source For Death Pictures and Death Video
blinkyv.jpg  

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Old 03-14-2011, 02:48 AM
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:55 AM
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Re: Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast

they are releaseing this shit back into the sea and yes that is what we will be eating. every bit of water in the world will be contaminated by this shit. for some people they think this is funny but the real reality is this hurts all of us. the entire world. not just japan

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Old 03-14-2011, 03:32 AM
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Re: Possible Second Tsunami/Second Nuclear Plant Blast

any update on this? Honshu?

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