Go Back  

The Origins Of "Oorah" (USMC) 

Current Rating:

Join NowJoin Now
  #1  
Old 04-26-2012, 07:33 AM
Ess-Eye
Offline:
So Fucking Banned
Poster Rank:90
Cyborg.
Join Date: Feb 2010
 
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Quoted: 1515 Post(s)
Activity Longevity
0/20 14/20
Today Posts
0/11 ssss11605
The Origins Of "Oorah" (USMC)

Some will undoubtedly find this boring but it was something I often wondered about but never bothered to research, it's only a Wiki article but I found it really interesting and learned something new from it, maybe some others will too
________________________________

Oorah is a battle cry common in the United States Marine Corps since the mid-20th century. It is comparable to hooah in the US Army and hooyah in the US Navy and US Coast Guard. It is most commonly used to respond to a verbal greeting or as an expression of enthusiasm.

Origins:

There are several potential sources from which the word "oorah" originated.

The 1st Amphibious Reconnaissance Company, FMFPAC can be credited with the introduction of "Ooh-rah!" into the Marine Corps in 1953, shortly after the Korean War, Recon Marines served aboard the USS Perch (ASSP-313), a WWII-era diesel submarine retrofitted to carry Navy UDT and Recon Marines. Whenever the boat was to dive, the 1MC (PA system) would announce "DIVE! DIVE!", followed by the sound of the diving klaxon: "AHUGA!" In 1953 or 1954, while on a conditioning run, former Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps John R. Massaro, while serving as company Gunnery Sergeant of 1st Amphibious Reconnaissance Battalion, simulated the "Dive" horn sound "AHUGA!" as part of the cadence. Legend has it, he took it with him when he went to serve as an instructor at the Drill Instructor school at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego. He there passed it on to the Drill Instructor students and they, in turn, passed it on to their recruits where it eventually and naturally became a part of the Recon cadence, and thereafter infiltrated Recon Marine lexicon. Over time, "AHUGA!" morphed into the shorter, simpler "Oorah!" Today, the official Marine Corps Training Reference Manual on the history of Marine Recon is titled "AHUGA!"

The term may also have been derived from the Turkish phrase "vur ha!" translated as "strike!" or "kill them all!", which was used as a battle cry at the Ottoman Empire army and adopted as a Russian battlecry "Urrah!"

The term may have been derived from the acronym "HUA" meaning "Heard Understood Acknowledged".

Culture:

Owing to its relatively recent origins, it is less common for Marines who served in the Vietnam War or earlier to be familiar with "Oorah!", but most post-Vietnam Marines and Vietnam War Marines who continued to serve after the war will have learned it throughout their careers.

A couple of shortened versions of "Oorah!" can come out as a short, sharp, monosyllabic guttural "Er!" or "Rah!"

Another phrase similar to "Oorah" is the bark, also commonly used by Marines, due to the nickname "Devil Dogs" from the Battle of Belleau Wood in World War I.

Other uses of "Oorah":

"Oorah" is also used by United States Navy Hospital Corpsman , Master-At-Arms and Seabees because of their close association with the Marine Corps.

"Oorah" is also used by the Russian Ground Forces for the same purposes, though historically the cry was a genuine battle cry, shouted in unison and with a long drag on 'a' while attacking in formation. "Oorah" is a correct transliteration for "Ура" (as it would be rendered in Cyrillic), the Russian equivalent of "Hooray." Proper pronunciation of this word places emphasis on the second syllable, in contrast to the Marine Corps exclamation. It is possible that the Russian word was a loanword form of "hurrah"--there is commonality in both the placement of emphasis and the purpose of the words. The depictions of WWII and 19th century wars in Soviet films made the prolonged, overlapping waves of "Ooraah" a symbol of courage and defiance needed for pushing the attack forward and, by extension, a symbol of Russian infantry in general.

"Oorah" is also used by the Military of Bulgaria as salute to higher ranked officers and politicians. "Oorah" was also used by the Bulgarian infantry while bayonet attacks.

In the Netherlands, the cry "Long live the Queen!" is usually followed by three times "Hoera" (pronounced much the same way). A notable example is the State Opening of Parliament, when parliamentarians cheer the Queen in this way after she finishes reading the Speech from the Throne.

"Oorah" is also used by Oorah Kiruv Rechokim.

"Oorah" is also used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Ess-Eye For This Useful Post:
Faline, smackem, swede1775
  #2  
Old 04-26-2012, 02:45 PM
smackem's Avatar
smackem
Offline:
My Rank: MAJOR
Poster Rank:6
Io ti amo teneramente Kelly Jo
Join Date: Mar 2009
 
Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Quoted: 10318 Post(s)
Activity Longevity
11/20 15/20
Today Posts
0/11 ssss69298
Re: The Origins Of "Oorah" (USMC)

"Oorah" is also used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

I did not know. Probably out of frustration when they spill their Tim Hortons.

Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to smackem For This Useful Post:
Ess-Eye
  #3  
Old 04-26-2012, 05:26 PM
Ess-Eye
Offline:
So Fucking Banned
Poster Rank:90
Cyborg.
Join Date: Feb 2010
 
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Quoted: 1515 Post(s)
Activity Longevity
0/20 14/20
Today Posts
0/11 ssss11605
Quote:
Originally Posted by smackem View Post
"Oorah" is also used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

I did not know. Probably out of frustration when they spill their Tim Hortons.
I think in the Canadians case, they're probably saying "Ourah" the wrong way, same way they say "Aboot" instead of "About"

Reply With Quote

Powered by vBulletin Copyright 2000-2010 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited.

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO