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  #61  
Old 08-21-2014, 02:17 PM
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Re: MP's,Celebs & Paedophilia

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Fixed

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Old 08-21-2014, 02:41 PM
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Thanks for your help Gatagato

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Old 08-21-2014, 02:48 PM
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Now we know why the "investigations" aint likely to lead to any one important

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Old 08-21-2014, 02:49 PM
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Old 08-25-2014, 03:57 PM
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Sad but very true


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Old 08-26-2014, 11:01 AM
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My father, the Earl who raped me as a boy: In a harrowing interview, writer reveals why he's risked wrath of his aristocratic brother and sisters by exposing him

Robert Montagu was abused by his father, the 10th Earl of Sandwich

Abuse took place on an almost daily basis from the age of seven until 11

The 64-year-old knows of ten other victims, but suspects there are more

His brother, the 11th Earl, and his sisters do not know he is going public




Dark secret: Robert Montagu, 64, was abused by his father Victor, the 10th Earl of Sandwich, on an almost daily basis from the age of seven until he was 11

When Robert Montagu, younger brother of the Earl of Sandwich, first decided to publish his memoir, he thought he’d present it as fiction, using a pseudonym, such was the painful nature of the story that was about to unfold.
His was a disturbing tale about an innocent seven-year-old boy whose father confused love with lust and abused him on an almost daily basis until he was 11.
Yet Robert, son of the 10th Earl of Sandwich, knew all too well this was not fiction.
And when A Humour Of Love is published next month, it will be under his own name.
In making that choice, he knows he is risking everything, not only his family name but his good relations with his sisters and his brother John, the 11th Earl, none of whom know of his decision to expose their father, who Robert believes abused up to 20 boys.
A charming, gentle, articulate, man, Robert is not doing this out of vengeance but a belief that this is a story that must be told.
In 2000, he qualified as a family therapist after many years running a successful import business and this, too, is one of the reasons he wishes to be honest now.
Speaking from his Dorset home a few miles from the family house, Mapperton, where the abuse took place, Robert, 64, says: ‘There’s a huge amount of shame and a huge will not to cause damage within your family.
‘I wrote the first draft when I was 16 and I’ve probably done ten versions since then.
'I always intended it to be written as a novel but then I came to realise in the last three months it had to be done as a memoir.
‘If you want the message to come across that people should be brave enough to speak out, you really have to put your name to it and write it with people’s names as they are.

‘After all, as a therapist I spend my life advising people to tell what’s happened to them, and I can’t therefore continue to take cover under my own story and disguise it. It’s not an honest thing to do.’
It’s a brave decision but one that is not without consequences, particularly for his brother, a respected member of the House of Lords.
‘He’s read the book but not with my name on the cover and his name in the text. He will be horrified that I’m doing this as an open account,’ says Robert. ‘And so will my sisters. They will be upset by it being an autobiography. But that’s the way it has to be.

‘I could lose all contact with my brother. He’s a very successful crossbencher and is a popular man, a fine man. It’s going to give him problems walking round the House of Lords and I sympathise with him but I’m afraid I can’t spare him... I’ve spared him for 55 years.’
Robert was just seven when his father suggested he visit him in his bedroom each morning. Victor was an upstanding member of the establishment. Descended from the fourth Earl, John Montagu, who famously invented the sandwich and sponsored Captain James Cook’s voyages of exploration, Victor renounced his title in order to sit in the Commons as the Conservative MP for South Dorset.
He married Rosemary Peto, goddaughter of Queen Maud of Norway, and the couple had six children, of which Robert was the youngest.
However, when Rosemary left him, later forming friendships with a number of women, Victor turned to his son for comfort.
In A Humour of Love, Robert describes in unsparing detail the way in which his father groomed him. How hugs and tickles gave way to kisses, which gave way to serial and serious abuse.
It is still difficult for Robert to recall that time. ‘It was what we did every day,’ he says quietly.
‘It was accepted that I would always go to his room at half past seven in the morning until quarter to nine.
‘I felt I was fulfilling a function of my mother who was missing. It was my duty, to some extent, to be in the position I was in and that is the reason I did not resist. That feeling was hinted at by my father, by sometimes making comments comparing me to my mother. He never said it in outright terms – we never discussed what he was doing in any terms whatsoever – but it was implicit that I was helping him emotionally.
‘And that was what would happen every single day. It was never questioned by anybody. My sisters have asked and I said “Surely you always knew?” and they said no, they didn’t.

‘You castigate yourself later for not telling anybody and also not refusing to go. But when things start at that age, it feels the natural order of the world so there is no questioning it.
‘And also there is a degree of comfort, you enjoy the storytelling, the closeness and, to an extent, as an immature child, you enjoy the physical contact. You don’t enjoy it as it begins to get more grotesque as time goes on.
‘There was a sense of duty but I was determined the only part I would play was a passive one. And I think, in retrospect, that wasn’t helpful at all – becoming like a little statue.
‘Because it turns a part of you to stone. If you become stone for one hour a day when you’re with your father, it has effects on your feelings later. And those effects continued to haunt my life.’
Robert shows me a picture of him as a ten-year-old boy.
He is beautiful, with a thick mop of blonde hair. A year later the serial abuse was to culminate in a single act of rape.
‘You wouldn’t suspect there was anything going on in that child’s life that wasn’t completely kosher,’ says Robert.
‘It makes me sad for that child, that he had to put up such a front. At that time he wasn’t sure if he was a boy or a girl. And he felt like a little prostitute.’

Silence descends on the room.

The abuse was finally discovered when one of Robert’s sisters realised he was sharing a bath with their father. Shortly afterwards, his mother and the family doctor sat him down and questioned him. He told them everything.
Days later, he was sent back to prep school, confused and terrified that his father would go to prison. Instead, the family decided to say nothing, protecting the reputation of the family whose motto, ironically, is ‘Post Tot Naufragia Portum’ – ‘After so many shipwrecks, a haven’.
Robert says: ‘I do think we have to take this problem more seriously – pursuing people who act in this way and not allowing them to escape. It’s easy for me to say that.
'I let my father escape, as have all my family. But we’ve got to get tougher. I particularly want families to be active in reporting. It’s a difficult thing but it must be done.
‘You cannot have an 11-year-old telling of abuse that had reached a zenith and not act. You must make sure that person is not in a position to do the same again.’
As Robert grew older, he realised there were others. Once he saw the paperboy go into his father’s bedroom and close the door. Victor, who died in 1995 aged 88, also abused one of Robert’s schoolfriends.
Robert says: ‘I know personally of ten (victims) and I’ve spoken with most of those. They were family friends, London contacts, Dorset contacts, holiday contacts.
‘I suspect it might be 20, possibly more. He was extraordinary because he was a very open, generous man.
‘He liked people, he had a good touch with his ordinary constituents, he was very close and affectionate with women, but he had a dark side that nobody knew much about.’ After the abuse was revealed, Robert continued to see Victor.
Difficult as it might be for many to understand, their father-son relationship survived. Determined to carve out a ‘normal’ life, Robert met his wife, Marzia Colonna, the successful sculptor and artist, when he was 17. They married three years later and had four children and now have nine grandchildren.
The single most remarkable thing to happen to me was meeting my wife,’ says Robert. ‘It took two years to form a proper relationship but we’ve been very strong since day one and have been married now for 44 years. My wife knew. I said I wanted to continue seeing my father without any disturbance. But I made sure there was no visiting with my father by my children when we were not present.
‘They knew when they were about 12 or 14 and were shocked in turn. And of course there were some feelings of how could you go on taking us down to see the old man? And I think I reacted by saying I loved him. Although he was abusive, I didn’t want to denounce him. I never referred to what had happened and neither did he.



Past lives: Victor and Rosemary pose for a happy family snap with John, now the 11th Earl, and two of their daughters, none of whom know Robert are about to go public with his story of the abuse

‘There were occasions when I could easily have raised the subject. I spared him, I suppose. In retrospect, I wish I’d had the courage to face him and question him about it. But this is the way life pans out. You don’t have the courage early on.
‘I think, probably true of his generation, he sort of felt he had a divine right to do as he pleased, especially within his family. And that what he was doing was not wrong. I don’t know how he justified that with God because he was a God-fearing man. But he came to some arrangement in his mind that permitted him.’
Instead, it was Robert’s relationship with his mother, who died in 1997, that suffered the most.
‘We would allude to what had happened but not go into the detail,’ Robert explains. ‘She was very uncomfortable with it and very guilt-ridden. It affected us hugely because she was very ashamed. She was very shocked by what had happened and also quite disgusted by it, which made it much more difficult for me because I felt she was disgusted with me. And I think to an extent she was.
‘And so she wouldn’t allow me to touch her sometimes. She wanted to be close to me, she was very loving, but the other side of herself was repelled. I found that very difficult to cope with.
‘I did lose my mother to a great extent. I went on living in her house until I was 17 but it was increasingly difficult, irritable on both sides, and she drank a lot, partly as a result of what happened.’
Robert has tried to use his experiences for the good. Ten years ago, he set up the Dorset Child and Family Counselling Trust which offers counselling to children, adolescents and families on the waiting lists for NHS appointments. He and a team of therapists see 175 families a year across the county and he would like to make it into a national charity.
‘I’ve managed to do pretty well over the years through a combination of helpful influences – my wife, writing and performing as a therapist, bringing up children in a way that’s loving but not abusive.
‘Had it not happened, I wouldn’t have become a therapist. And I wouldn’t have gone on to do what I’m most proud of, which is build a trust which helps children who are emotionally distressed.’
This, of course, is the cause closest to his heart and is the main reason he wrote his memoir.
It is an important book and will undoubtedly help victims and their relatives to face up to the terrible nature of abuse and devastating consequences of sweeping it under the carpet.
Robert says: ‘It takes an awful lot of courage for anybody who has been put in a situation like this to give an honest account.
‘I hope this will help people to be brave. That’s what the book is for.’



Secret abuse: Robert aged ten with his father Victor



Happy facade: Mapperton, in Dorset, the family home where Robert was abused

Another dead nonce being named,get the still alive cunts,sooner the better

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Old 08-26-2014, 11:14 AM
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Rotherham child abuse scandal: 1,400 children exploited, report finds

At least 1,400 children were subjected to "appalling" sexual exploitation in Rotherham between 1997 and 2013, a report has found.

Children as young as 11 were raped by multiple perpetrators, abducted, trafficked to other cities in England, beaten and intimidated it said.

The report, commissioned by Rotherham Borough Council in 2013, revealed there had been three previous inquiries.

Five men from the town were jailed for sexual offences against girls in 2010.

'Doused in petrol'

Professor Alexis Jay, who wrote the latest report, said there had been "blatant" collective failures by the council's leadership, senior managers had "underplayed" the scale of the problem and South Yorkshire Police had failed to prioritise the issue.

Prof Jay said police "regarded many child victims with contempt" and that by far the majority of perpetrators were described as 'Asian' by victims".

Despite this, the report concluded: "Several staff described their nervousness about identifying the ethnic origins of perpetrators for fear of being thought as racist; others remembered clear direction from their managers not to do so."

Revealing details of the inquiry's findings, Prof Jay said: "It is hard to describe the appalling nature of the abuse that child victims suffered.

She said she found examples of "children who had been doused in petrol and threatened with being set alight, threatened with guns, made to witness brutally violent rapes and threatened they would be next if they told anyone".

Failures by those charged with protecting children happened despite three reports between 2002 and 2006 which both the council and police were aware of, and "which could not have been clearer in the description of the situation in Rotherham".

She said the first of these reports was "effectively suppressed" because senior officers did not believe the data. The other two were ignored, she said.

The inquiry team found that in the early 2000s when a group of professionals attempted to monitor a number of children believed to be at risk, "managers gave little help or support to their efforts".

The report revealed some people at a senior level in the police and children's social care thought the extent of the problem was being "exaggerated".

Prof Jay said: "The authorities involved have a great deal to answer for."

'Horrific experiences'

Rotherham council's chief executive, Martin Kimber, said he accepted the report and the recommendations made and apologised to the victims of abuse.

He said: "The report does not make comfortable reading in its account of the horrific experiences of some young people in the past, and I would like to reiterate our sincere apology to those who were let down when they needed help.

"I commissioned this independent review to understand fully what went wrong, why it went wrong and to ensure that the lessons learned in Rotherham mean these mistakes can never happen again.

"The report confirms that our services have improved significantly over the last five years and are stronger today than ever before.

"This is important because it allows me to reassure young people and families that should anyone raise concerns we will take them seriously and provide them with the support they need.

"However, that must not overshadow - and certainly does not excuse - the finding that for a significant amount of time the council and its partners could and should have done more to protect young people from what must be one of the most horrific forms of abuse imaginable."



(Clockwise from top left) Mohsin Khan, 21, Razwan Razaq, 30, Adil Hussain, 20, Zafran Ramzan, 21, and Umar Razaq, 24, from Rotherham were jailed for sexual offences against girls in 2010

Just what can you say about this fucked up systemic abuse

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  #68  
Old 08-30-2014, 04:25 PM
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Re: MP's,Celebs & Paedophilia

Rotherham abuse 1,400
children were abused, 1997-2013

+ 30% of victims were already known to social services

157 reports concerning child sexual exploitation made to police in 2013

9 prosecutions were made

Source: Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Exploitation in Rotherham


The fear of being seen as racist

A fear of being viewed as racist has been cited as one of the reasons why child sexual exploitation in Rotherham was allowed to proliferate for 16 years. But how much of a factor is this fear in the day-to-day work of social workers and others working to prevent abuse?

Prof Alexis Jay's harrowing report revealed the abuse of more than 1,400 children - mainly by men of Pakistani heritage - and it criticised councillors for "downplaying" the issue of race, and "avoiding public discussion" on the topic.

The report also made it clear that this nervousness around ethnicity was a top-down sentiment.

While frontline staff themselves were not blamed, some social-care staff said they were "advised by their managers to be cautious about referring to the ethnicity".

A fear to confront the subject of race ultimately stopped the council engaging with the wider Rotherham community about the problem, the report suggested.

But does an anxiety of being labelled a racist really exist within councils?

Former social worker Alastair Johnstone believes so. He worked for Islington Council with both adults and children for 18 years before retiring in 2004.

While he says he was never pressured by managers to include or exclude any particular subject matter from his reports, he does agree that among some white councillors there was an undeniable fear and desire to not "upset the apple-cart".

"In my opinion some white councillors were terrified of mentioning things to do with ethnicity. And I understand where it comes from, political correctness has left its mark on them, but it actually does a disservice to the wider community."

He says that during his training as a social worker he was encouraged to understand and speak about ethnicity. "It's part of understanding the situation you are dealing with, and it absolutely shouldn't be ignored," he says.

And this latter viewpoint is echoed by former social-worker-turned MP Emma Lewell-Buck, who spent seven years working in child protection for local authorities in both Sunderland and Newcastle, but has also served a councillor. She agrees that understanding racial backgrounds was a fundamental part of social workers' training, and she believes something had gone "seriously wrong in Rotherham".

"I imagine in some institutions there is a fear of being accused of racism, and some people get jittery about political correctness. Obviously in Rotherham they were very jittery about it, and as a result no-one spoke up for those poor children.

"But because of my training as a social worker I'm not afraid to mention the elephant in the room, whether it's ethnicity or anything else."

For the councillors in Rotherham, Jay described their apparent reticence to come forward about race as "at best naive, and at worst ignoring a politically inconvenient truth".

However, former Nottingham social worker Shad Ali goes further and calls it "manipulation".

Ali, who comes from a Pakistani background, says: "This is nothing to do with political correctness or anything else. This is men in power trying to protect their jobs and maintain the status quo.

"I never experienced this fear of voicing concerns for being labelled a racist during my time in social work, and neither did I see that in my managers. To say that is what happened negates the truth."

The Rotherham report also made clear that the issue of "downplaying" race as a factor applied to the police. There has a been a long battle to tackle institutional racism in British police forces, so could some senior officers have been left with a residual fear about ever highlighting race as a factor in any situation?

The Times was reporting on the issue of gangs of Pakistani heritage targeting children from the beginning of 2011, sparked by a court case from the previous year. In September 2012, Times journalist Andrew Norfolk revealed the existence of a confidential 2010 police report that had warned thousands of such crimes were being committed in South Yorkshire each year by networks of Asian men.



South Yorkshire's police chief Shaun Wright

In October 2012, the council, South Yorkshire Police, and other agencies set up a Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) team to investigate the issues raised in the report, although South Yorkshire Police denied it had been reluctant to tackle child sexual abuse or that "ethnic origin had been a factor" in its decisions.

But warning signs had been there almost a decade before. Jay's inquiry followed three others in Rotherham dating back to 2002. Jay said the first of these reports was "effectively suppressed" because senior police officers did not believe the data, while the other two were ignored.

Away from South Yorkshire, is there an atmosphere in police forces that makes people wary of ethnicity as a factor in investigations?

One former frontline police officer from Nottinghamshire, who did not want to be named, says officers were always imbued with an "awareness to be politically correct".

"We used to go on courses for sexism and racism, we were told that it was something that we must get exactly right. I can't speak for other officers in higher positions, but they may have felt a greater pressure over race when it came to issues like stop and search for example."

Police forces are still regularly criticised for failing to tackle racism, but now they - along with councils - will face greater scrutiny over the possibility of failing to act because of anxiety over appearing racist.


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Old 08-30-2014, 04:27 PM
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Ray Honeyford: Racist or right?

Ex-head teacher of school in Bradford where more than 90% of pupils were non-white

Sparked national controversy in 1984 with outspoken criticism of multiculturalism

Objected to the right of different cultures to remain separate within the same country and attacked political correctness

Suspended in 1985 but later won appeal and went back to work

Disgruntled parents and others organised large-scale protests outside school, while about half of pupils ceased to attend

Honeyford given police protection but agreed to retire early in December 1985 - he never worked as a teacher again

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Rotherham abuse: Ed Miliband says child abuse inquiry 'delayed too long'

A government inquiry into child abuse "needs to get moving" in the light of the "devastating" Rotherham scandal, Labour leader Ed Miliband has said.

A report on child sexual exploitation has found at least 1,400 children were abused in Rotherham from 1997-2013.

The Home Office inquiry into how public bodies have handled child abuse claims was delayed when Baroness Butler-Sloss stood down as its chair in July.

Mr Miliband said it had been "delayed too long".

Professor Alexis Jay's report, published on Tuesday, found children as young as 11 were raped by multiple perpetrators, abducted, trafficked to other cities, beaten and intimidated.

The report found there had been "blatant" collective failures by the council's leadership and South Yorkshire Police had failed to prioritise the issue.

In a statement Mr Miliband said: "The case now is overwhelming for the Government to get an overarching inquiry into child abuse up and running.

"We have seen scandals of child abuse in different institutions, in different parts of the country and stretching across different decades.

"An overarching inquiry has been delayed too long and needs to get moving as fast as possible to start listening to all those who have been let down by a system set up to protect them."

Theresa May announced on 7 July that an independent inquiry would be held to investigate the way public bodies handled historical child sex abuse allegations, but a new chairman has not yet been announced to replace Baroness Butler-Sloss.

A Home Office spokesman said: "We have to get this appointment right and we need someone at its head with gravitas and experience.

"We are working as quickly as we can on this, and we will announce a new chair as soon as possible."



'Weren't seen as victims'

Mr Miliband also echoed calls for South Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) Shaun Wright to step down.

Mr Wright, who was Rotherham Council's cabinet member for children and young people's services from 2005-2010, resigned from the Labour Party earlier this week but said he remained committed to his role as PCC.

Meanwhile the Labour MP for Rotherham, Sarah Champion, said the victims of sexual exploitation "deserve personal apologies".

She said one of the most upsetting parts of the report was that babies born to some victims were taken away from them.

Prof Jay's report said a number of sexually exploited children and young people had "pregnancies, miscarriages and terminations".

"Some had children removed under care orders and suffered further trauma when contact with their child was terminated and alternative family placements found," she said.



Professor Alexis Jay's report said a number of victims became pregnant

Ms Champion said: "That some babies born to the victims as a direct result of such horrific abuse were taken away and never seen by their mothers again speaks volumes about the way these children weren't seen as victims at all.

"I intend to press the council to find out what work is being done to identify both mothers and their babies, and the counselling support being offered.

"The victims involved deserve personal apologies."



Ed Miliband said the Home Office's inquiry had been "delayed too long"

You can tell when it's getting close to elections eh,usual blah blah and soon forgotton

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