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Old 09-28-2011, 12:43 PM
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Re: Michael Jackson Trial

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Originally Posted by :meeb: View Post
I believe it, he was the perfect target. Fucked up, misunderstood, child star, black, loved, targeted for character assassination, and had a shit load of money. He made a lot of enemies just by being himself.
What a child molester?

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  #12  
Old 09-28-2011, 04:23 PM
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Re: Michael Jackson Trial

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A frantic voicemail left by Dr Conrad Murray just moments after Michael Jackson's death has been played to a Los Angeles courtroom.

Dr Murray, who is accused of the involuntary manslaughter of the star, can be heard in the message saying: "Call me right away, please. Please call me right away. Thank you."
The message had been left for Michael Amir Williams, Jackson's former personal assistant, who took the stand on Wednesday.
Mr Williams told the court that Dr Murray said Jackson had suffered a "bad reaction" and that he needed to "get here right away".
He said the doctor never told him to call 911 or described Jackson's condition.
Prior to Mr Williams taking the stand, further concerns over the medical stability of Michael Jackson in the months prior to his death were described by Kathy Jorrie, a lawyer for tour promoter AEG Live.
She detailed intricate negotiations with Dr Murray in which he had requested that the purchase of a CPR machine was factored into his contract, as well as provisions to hire an additional nurse if in London if needed.
"He wanted to make sure that there was somebody else available to be of assistance," Ms Jorrie said.
She said Dr Murray told her the CPR machine was necessary due to the nature of Jackson's performances and the state of his health.
Earlier on Wednesday, AEG's Paul Gongaware continued his testimony from the previous day, revealing that the company is being sued by Jackson's mother Katherine for negligent supervision or Dr Murray while he worked for the singer.
On Tuesday, the opening of the trial contained dramatic evidence including a recording of the singer talking while under the influence of drugs and a photo of Jackson's body.
Mr Gongaware said he was aware of discussions about the singer's health.
He told the court he had been on the look out for Michael Jackson using drugs.
Mr Gongaware also told the court that it was Michael Jackson's idea to hire Dr Murray to work on the This Is It tour.
He said the relationship between Jackson and the singer was "friendly and caring."

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  #13  
Old 09-29-2011, 06:48 AM
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Re: Michael Jackson Trial

finnally some good info and pics from the jackson case

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Old 09-29-2011, 09:23 AM
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Re: Michael Jackson Trial

The voice-recording is indeed very interesting. Pretty scary..

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Old 09-30-2011, 05:20 PM
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Re: Michael Jackson Trial

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The first paramedic to reach Michael Jackson's bedroom has testified that the singer might have lived if his personal physician Dr Murray had called 911 immediately.
Richard Senneff said that Murray, who is on trial for involuntary manslaughter, told him that he had called emergency service as soon as he realised the star was in distress.
But prosecutors said that there was a 20-minute delay in summoning help.
The paramedic added that Dr Murray never revealed that he had given the singer a power anaesthetic.



Mr Senneff said there was a good chance that they could have restarted Jackson's heart if they had been called when Murray found the singer unconscious.
Murray appeared frantic when the paramedic arrived in the bedroom on the day of Jackson's death in June 2009, Mr Senneff said.

He was the first paramedic to reach Jackson's bedroom and said within moments, he and three other paramedics were working to revive Jackson.
He said that Jackson, who was wearing pyjamas and looked underweight, was being moved as he walked in. He said the singer was so thin his ribs were sticking out.
The paramedic said that he noticed an IV stand with an IV bag hanging on it, but that Murray did not answer when asked if Jackson had an underlying condition.

A photo of Michael Jackson's bedroom where he was found unconscious was shown in court:



He had to ask Murray three times about what condition Jackson had before the doctor answered.
'He said, "Nothing. He has nothing",' Mr Senneff said. 'Simply, that did not add up to me.'
Murray eventually told medics that he was treating the singer for exhaustion and dehydration.
When asked what medications he had given Jackson, Mr Senneff said Murray told him that he had only given Jackson the sedative lorazepam.
The doctor did not mention that he had been giving Jackson the surgical anesthetic propofol to help the singer sleep.
The veteran paramedic said Jackson was cool to the touch, his eyes were open and dry and had an IV in his leg.

He said that when they connected the singer to an EKG it showed a flatline.
As paramedics were about to give up they felt a pulse in Jackson's groin. They stopped CPR to check him again on a monitor, but again it showed a flatline.
Sugar levels in Jackson's blood also showed no change.
After trying multiple heart-starting medications and other efforts, Jackson was still lifeless.
In a call played to the court, emergency room personnel at a nearby hospital advised Mr Senneff to declare Jackson dead in his bedroom.
The dispatcher calls time of death in the phone call, but Mr Senneff tells him that Murray wants to continue efforts to revive the singer.
Mr Senneff said Jackson was transported because Murray wanted the life-saving efforts to continue.
The paramedic added that after he took Jackson down to the ambulance he returned to the bedroom to pick up equipment, where he saw Murray picking up items from the floor.
Murray, 58, has pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter. If convicted, Murray could face up to four years in prison and lose his medical license.
Prosecutors contend the Houston-based cardiologist repeatedly lied to medics and emergency room doctors about medications he had been giving Jackson in the singer's bedroom.
Authorities contend Murray administered a fatal dose of propofol and other sedatives. Murray's attorneys claim Jackson gave himself the fatal dose after his doctor left the room.
Prosecutors are expected to call another paramedic who treated Jackson.
Murray's trial is expected to last five weeks and is in its fourth day.
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Old 10-01-2011, 07:42 AM
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Re: Michael Jackson Trial

looking forward to the rest of the story as it unfolds

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  #17  
Old 10-01-2011, 04:45 PM
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Re: Michael Jackson Trial

After the first weeks trial:


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"This has been a very bad week for poor Dr Murray" - that is the opinion of high-profile Los Angeles criminal defence attorney Dana Cole on week one of the Conrad Murray trial.

Mr Cole worked on Michael Jackson's 2005 child molestation trial and has experience of facing David Walgren, the prosecutor in Murray's case, in court.
He told Sky News: "Dr Murray was sort of clobbered by the prosecution this week. All the witnesses have been terrible for him and the prosecution's opening statement was painful for him to listen to.
"Frankly, you see it on his face. He seems completely and totally dejected and pretty scared by what has unfolded in the courtroom."
Dr Murray has seen a trail of prosecution witnesses describe what they felt was suspicious behaviour on his part on the day Michael Jackson died in June 2009.
The defence will have to find some holes in what bodyguards and paramedics have described happening in the bedroom of 100 North Carolwood Drive in Bel Air's Holmby Hills neighbourhood.

If we can judge anything from the analysis on the evening entertainment shows, a staple of the LA media diet, the prosecution has done a pretty good job raising doubts about Dr Murray's "actions and omissions".
In a country that had perhaps tired of the Michael Jackson story a little, they certainly grabbed headlines by presenting the photograph of the deceased star and audio of him barely comprehensible under the influence of sedatives.
The question is whether they can convince the seven men and five women of the jury with what is largely circumstantial evidence.
For light relief, we have the continuing soap opera of Judge Michael Pastor's increasing annoyance with both legal teams. He was overheard to say: "I'm not going to tolerate this anymore" when the prosecution arrived back late after a break.
They blamed faulty lifts.

There have been constant interruptions to proceedings as lawyers bicker over what they can and cannot introduce as evidence.
Judge Pastor raised a laugh when the fire alarm went off: "Don't worry, it is a regular occurrence here. If it is serious, I will be the first one to leave."
Back to the really serious and, with week two looming, Mr Cole offered this glimmer of hope.
He said: "In any high profile case you can expect the unexpected. You never know what might come down the pike, who might emerge as a witness to turn it around. Right now, though, it looks pretty grim for him."
His advice to the Murray team? "Pray. A lot."

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Old 10-02-2011, 04:05 PM
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Re: Michael Jackson Trial

his life was a tragedy and all those in the courtroom should shoulder some responsability,addiction to benzo's is horrendous and you end up taking them as much as you can,i know because that was me a few years back,the audio was like listening to myself,i was made to come off of them,if i had money i would have bought them,i didnt,he did and if murray didnt give them he would have got them from someone else,a monthly wage of 150,000 a month is hard to walk away from unfortunately...

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  #19  
Old 10-03-2011, 03:24 PM
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Re: Michael Jackson Trial

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An emergency room physician told jurors Monday that Michael Jackson’s doctor never mentioned that he had given the singer the powerful anesthetic propofol.

Dr. Richelle Cooper recounted her conversations with Dr. Conrad Murray on the day Jackson died, telling jurors that he told her that he had only given the singer the sedative lorazepam.

Cooper resumed testifying Monday as Murray’s involuntary manslaughter trial began its second week.

Murray, 58, has pleaded not guilty and his defence lawyers claim Jackson gave himself a fatal dose of sedatives and propofol, which is normally administered in hospital settings.

Authorities say he administered the fatal dose and acted recklessly by providing Jackson the drug as a sleep aid.

Cooper testified she never asked Murray to sign a death certificate because, by the time he was brought to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Jackson became her patient.

“Mr. Jackson was my patient and I didn’t really have an explanation for why he was dead,” she said.

Cooper has previously testified she gave paramedics permission to pronounce Jackson dead, but that Murray wanted resuscitation efforts to continue at the hospital. She has said the singer was “clinically dead” when he arrived at the emergency room, and more than an hour of efforts did nothing to improve his condition.

Cooper also told jurors about trying to speak to Jackson’s children after he was pronounced dead at the hospital at 2:26 p.m. on June 25, 2009.

“They were crying,” Cooper said. “They were fairly hysterical.”

Cooper is the 12th witness prosecutors have called so far in the trial, which is expected to last five weeks.

Jackson loomed large throughout opening statements and testimony last week, with Deputy District Attorney David Walgren showing jurors a photo of a lifeless Jackson on a gurney and playing clips of his final performances from the film “This Is It.”

Jurors also heard during opening statements a never-before-heard recording of Jackson, rambling and slurring his words, which Walgren said was extracted from Murray’s cell phone.

The physician’s phone records are a central part of the prosecution case. Prosecutors intend to show records of Murray’s phone calls and emails from the hours before Jackson’s death to show that the singer had other things on his mind — getting his $150,000 a month deal to serve as Jackson’s personal physician approved, running his medical practices and fielding calls from mistresses.

During a preliminary hearing, prosecutors showed that Murray was engaged in three phone calls in the hour before he emerged from Jackson’s bedroom and frantically told a chef to seek help.

One of Murray’s former patients, Las Vegas salesman Robert Russell, detailed one of those calls for jurors last week. Russell praised Murray in testimony, crediting the doctor with saving his life, but said he had grown distant after going to work for Jackson.

Russell said he called the physician’s office seeking answers about his care on the day Jackson died. Murray returned the message at 11:49 a.m., roughly 15 minutes before telling Jackson’s chef to call security and asking to speak to Jackson’s eldest son, Prince.

At some point during the trial, prosecutors are expected to detail the other phone calls and emails Murray fielded that day, including one to his girlfriend that was apparently made in the back of the ambulance on the way to the hospital.

The exact order of witnesses is unclear.

The judge overseeing the case imposed a gag order last week prohibiting either side or their spokespeople from talking about the case outside of court.

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Old 10-04-2011, 12:17 AM
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