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Man Rescued After Boat Capsized and Sank 

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Old 06-12-2013, 02:17 PM
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Man Rescued After Boat Capsized and Sank

SA divers save man from horror fate
2013-06-12

Warri - After two days trapped in freezing cold water and breathing from an air bubble in an upturned tugboat under the ocean, Harrison Okene was sure he was going to die. Then a torch light pierced the darkness.

Ship's cook Okene, 29, was on board the Jascon-4 tugboat when it capsized on 26 May due to heavy Atlantic ocean swells around 30km off the coast of Nigeria, while stabilising an oil tanker filling up at a Chevron platform.

Of the 12 people on board, divers recovered 10 dead bodies while a remaining crew member has not been found.

Somehow Okene survived, breathing inside a 1.2m- high bubble of air as it shrunk in the waters slowly rising from the ceiling of the tiny toilet and adjoining bedroom where he sought refuge, until two South African divers eventually rescued him.

"I was there in the water in total darkness just thinking it's the end. I kept thinking the water was going to fill up the room but it did not," Okene said, parts of his skin peeling away after days soaking in the salt water.

"I was so hungry but mostly so, so thirsty. The salt water took the skin off my tongue," he said. Seawater got into his mouth, but he had nothing to eat or drink throughout his ordeal.

At 04:50 on 26 May, Okene says he was in the toilet when he realised the tugboat was beginning to turn over. As water rushed in and the Jascon-4 flipped, he forced open the metal door.

"As I was coming out of the toilet it was pitch black so we were trying to link our way out to the water tidal [exit hatch]," Okene told Reuters in his home town of Warri, a city in Nigeria's oil-producing Niger Delta.

"Three guys were in front of me and suddenly water rushed in full force. I saw the first one, the second one, the third one just washed away. I knew these guys were dead."

Smell bodies


What he didn't know was that he would spend the next two and a half days trapped under the sea praying he would be found.

Turning away from his only exit, Okene was swept along a narrow passageway by surging water into another toilet, this time adjoining a ship's officers cabin, as the overturned boat crashed onto the ocean floor. To his amazement he was still breathing.


Okene, wearing only his underpants, survived around a day in the .37m² toilet, holding onto the overturned washbasin to keep his head out of the water.

He built up the courage to open the door and swim into the officer's bedroom and began pulling off the wall panelling to use as a tiny raft to lift himself out of the freezing water.

He sensed he was not alone in the darkness.

"I was very, very cold and it was black. I couldn't see anything," says Okene, staring into the middle distance.

"But I could perceive the dead bodies of my crew were nearby. I could smell them. The fish came in and began eating the bodies. I could hear the sound. It was horror."

What Okene didn't know was a team of divers sent by Chevron and the ship's owners, West African Ventures, were searching for crew, assumed by now to be dead.

Then in the afternoon of 28 May, Okene heard them.

Boom, boom, boom


"I heard a sound of a hammer hitting the vessel. Boom, boom, boom. I swam down and found a water dispenser. I pulled the water filter and I hammered the side of the vessel hoping someone would hear me. Then the diver must have heard a sound."

Divers broke into the ship and Okene saw light from a head torch of someone swimming along the passageway past the room.

"I went into the water and tapped him. I was waving my hands and he was shocked," Okene said, his relief still visible.

He thought he was at the bottom of the sea, although the company says it was 30m below.

The diving team fitted Okene with an oxygen mask, diver's suit and helmet and he reached the surface at 19:32, more than 60 hours after the ship sank, he says.

Okene says he spent another 60 hours in a decompression chamber where his body pressure was returned to normal. Had he just been exposed immediately to the outside air he would have died.

The cook describes his extraordinary survival story as a "miracle" but the memories of his time in the watery darkness still haunt him and he is not sure he will return to the sea.

"When I am at home sometimes it feels like the bed I am sleeping in is sinking. I think I'm still in the sea again. I jump up and I scream," Okene said, shaking his head.

"I don't know what stopped the water from filling that room. I was calling on God. He did it. It was a miracle."


- Reuters

another source

Durban - In what has been described as an incredible feat, a team of South African divers, including at least four from Durban, has rescued a man who spent almost three days in an air bubble - 30m under the sea - after the tugboat he was on capsized off the coast of Nigeria.

Ten other crew members died and one is still missing. Many of them were locked in their cabins as a precaution against pirates.

But Nigerian Harrison Okene had just got up when the ship rolled. He was able to get himself into an air bubble just 1.5m by 3m, where he perched on a table to keep himself alive, drinking softdrinks out of cans that were floating around him.

According to the owners of the boat, West Africa Ventures, the vessel capsized, but did not sink to the bottom. It floated 30m below the surface, with Okene trapped inside. The vessel had been towing a tanker to a mooring buoy on May 26 when it was flipped by heavy swells.

The South African divers were on a different expedition on the West Coast of Africa when they responded to a May Day call. A 100km away the Chevron-chartered tugboat, AHT Jascon 4, had capsized. It was 27km off Escaros in the oil rich Delta state of Nigeria.

What was meant to be a body recovery mission for the South African divers turned into an underwater rescue when, after 60 hours alone in the wreck, Okene grabbed a diver as he swam past, having earlier failed to attract the attention of the first diver down.


Divers were shocked to have found Okene alive and said they were amazed by how calm he was during the rescue. Because he had been 30m underwater his body had filled with nitrogen and divers had to put him into a decompression helmet before he could be safely brought to the surface.

Okene’s incredible feat and the divers’ effort to bring him to the surface safely has caught the attention of maritime experts and international film-makers who want to turn the rescue into a documentary.

Writing on the Facebook page of a maritime website, Paul McDonald, a “dynamic positioning officer” on board the dive support vessel involved with the recovery and rescue mission, said: “All on board could not believe how cool he was when being rescued. The divers put a diving helmet and harness on to him and he followed the diver to the bell where he was then taken to deck level and kept in the chamber and decompressed for 2 days. It was amazing to be part of this rescue and my sympathy is with the families who lost (their) loved ones.”

Rob Almeida, an accomplished sailor and partner at gCaptain, in an article written for the company’s website, had spoken to former US Navy Salvage Officer Patrick Keenan about the amazing rescue

“The fact this person survived is incredible,” commented Keenan. “After spending two days at 30 meters of depth, he had become saturated, meaning his body had absorbed all the pressurised gases and equalised with the surrounding water pressure. Bringing him to surface from that depth, and after having been saturated at 3 or 4 atmospheres, could easily have killed him.” In saturation diving, divers are brought to the surface from depth using a pressurised diving bell, which mates up to a pressurised chamber on deck. This allows the “saturated” divers to live and work above and below the surface at a steady pressure state for an indefinite period of time, and most importantly, to be brought to the surface safely,” Keenan wrote.

Specialist deep sea diver Patrick Voorma, who owns Calypso Dive Centre at uShaka Marine World, said it was incredible that Harrison was able to survive at those depths for such a long period.

“When you are under water, your internal body pressure will become the same pressure as the water pressure surrounding you. If you go down to 30m there is four bars of pressure - double the pressure in your car tyres - being exerted in your body,” he said.

“By staying under water for such a long time, your body becomes saturated and you will have four bars worth of gas pressure in your body of which the nitrogen will be the problem.”


“It will be like opening up a can of Coke. All that nitrogen will just rush out of your body and will give you a gas embolism which can kill you instantly.”

Corrie van Kessel, spokeswoman for West Africa Ventures, said on Thursday that the divers had yet to find the body of the 12th crew member.

“The search and rescue operation that has been under way since 26 May 2013 has had to be stopped for safety reasons.

The vessel, Jascon 4, which is located some 30 metres under water in an upside down position, has become so unstable that the risk of injury to our rescue divers has become unacceptably high,” Van Kessel said in a statement.

“Our divers performed an extremely difficult and dangerous task in the most testing of conditions and we are grateful for their professional service as well as the contributions of many other personnel who gave all their efforts to this challenging recovery operation.”

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Old 06-12-2013, 02:22 PM
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Re: Man Rescued After Boat Capsised and Sank

capsized my humble apologies

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Old 06-14-2013, 11:04 AM
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Re: Man Rescued After Boat Capsized and Sank

great survival story

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Old 06-14-2013, 01:12 PM
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Re: Man Rescued After Boat Capsized and Sank

What a crazy. That has got to be terrifying

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Old 06-14-2013, 01:13 PM
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Re: Man Rescued After Boat Capsized and Sank

*story

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Old 06-22-2013, 04:09 AM
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Re: Man Rescued After Boat Capsized and Sank

i see my african education has rubbed off on you.

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