#51  
Old 10-15-2014, 11:38 PM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

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Originally Posted by bob351 View Post
Im on the fence between ignorance from places like cdc and other authorities just shitting the bed on research and not realizing how contagious it really is or them playing it down.


I mean the way I hear some news stations talking they refer to blood on blood transmission and how hard it is to get, shit like that. Then pan to some footage of people in biohazard suits dealing with patients.

Then im thinking yep, looks totally hard to get.
Purely as a preventative measure, should they be nude?

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  #52  
Old 10-15-2014, 11:44 PM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

They should but its just funny to see the contrast between its very hard to get then seeing biohazard suits.

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  #53  
Old 10-15-2014, 11:53 PM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

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Originally Posted by bob351 View Post
They should but its just funny to see the contrast between its very hard to get then seeing biohazard suits.
I see your point.. Technically though, there could be some unlikely chance that an infection is spread without those measures. Someone could easily have micro-tears in their skin via chapped lips, scrapes or sores and somehow come in contact with the infected persons bodily fluids before their exposure to the air.

It makes me laugh hearing people saying it's going to become airborne.. Viruses don't mutate like that, or we would be scared of HIV/AIDS doing the same thing.

Don't get me wrong, this is an issue for Africa right now. But it should in no way cause panic from those in the Americas..

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  #54  
Old 10-16-2014, 04:39 AM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

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Originally Posted by Mr Poo View Post
I see your point.. Technically though, there could be some unlikely chance that an infection is spread without those measures. Someone could easily have micro-tears in their skin via chapped lips, scrapes or sores and somehow come in contact with the infected persons bodily fluids before their exposure to the air.

It makes me laugh hearing people saying it's going to become airborne.. Viruses don't mutate like that, or we would be scared of HIV/AIDS doing the same thing.

Don't get me wrong, this is an issue for Africa right now. But it should in no way cause panic from those in the Americas..
Viruses can become airborne but it depends a lot on the target the virus attacks mainly. HIV is mainly found in the blood more than anything so it would be least likely to mutate to become airborne since what would be the point if it doesn't need to infect the lungs.
Ebola on the other hand can be found in all bodily fluids (blood, saliva, vomit,...etc.) and since mucus covers many of our tissues like our lungs it can essentially survive within the droplets so it doesn't have to worry about air exposure. Of course you just have to be within sneezing distance, but it has more of an obvious path to follow to become ariborne than HIV. Everytime ebola infects a person, it mutates in some way so by random chance, one mutation in the right gene can cause it to become airborne.
It's highly unlikely though, but we've never had an ebola outbreak this severe and because it has infected so many people, it has mutated a lot more than it has in past outbreaks. If it does mutate to become airborne, the virus itself will also become much weaker as a result ( so I've been told).
Not an expert on the subject, but my boyfriend is an immunologist and he knows a lot more about this sort of thing than I ever could. I've always found ebola to be fascinating and frightening at the same time.

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  #55  
Old 10-16-2014, 02:21 PM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

Sounds promising. Now where is Rob and his global killer virus talk?
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The Department of Health and Human Services awarded Tuesday an $8.2 million contract to Baltimore-based Profectus BioSciences Inc. for research and development of an Ebola vaccine proven 100 percent effective in animal tests, according to the company.

The Defense Department’s Joint Project Manager Medical Countermeasure Systems located at Ft. Detrick, Maryland, is working with Australia and Canada on development of the Profectus vaccine to defend against bio-weapon attacks and to help public health agencies in all three countries combat Ebola, the unit’s commander, Col. Russell Coleman said in a Sept. 24 presentation.

Elleen Kane, an HHS spokeswoman, said the contract is for animal studies but did not provide any further details.

In a paper presented to an international vaccine conference in 2012, Profectus said its vaccine provided 100 percent protection for monkeys and guinea pigs in tests with the Zaire variant of Ebola. The company said its research has been backed by grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

The Ebola vaccine contract award comes as the U.S. deals with the case of a second Ebola infection by a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. The nurse tested positive for the virus after caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, who was treated at the hospital and died Oct. 8.

The World Health Organization said in late August more than 240 health care workers had developed the disease in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, and more than 120 had died.

In its 2012 paper, Profectus said its Ebola vaccine would help protect health care workers from the virus.

“An effective prophylactic vaccine would find application with medical personnel and close contacts during outbreaks in endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa, with laboratory workers engaged in filovirus research, and with military and civilian personnel threatened by weaponized filoviruses,” the paper stated.

At a Sept. 5 press conference in Geneva following a meeting of 200 virus experts, Marie-Paule Kieny, assistant director general of WHO, said researchers may have enough data from small human studies of new Ebola vaccines to warrant offering them to health care workers and other front-line staff caring for Ebola patients by November.



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  #56  
Old 10-16-2014, 06:32 PM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

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Originally Posted by mr black View Post
Sounds promising. Now where is Rob and his global killer virus talk?
Oh, so they found a vaccine that was 100% effective in animals, on a different strain than this one

Um, yeah, ok

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Old 10-16-2014, 06:41 PM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

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Originally Posted by Mr Poo View Post
I see your point.. Technically though, there could be some unlikely chance that an infection is spread without those measures. Someone could easily have micro-tears in their skin via chapped lips, scrapes or sores and somehow come in contact with the infected persons bodily fluids before their exposure to the air.

It makes me laugh hearing people saying it's going to become airborne.. Viruses don't mutate like that, or we would be scared of HIV/AIDS doing the same thing.

Don't get me wrong, this is an issue for Africa right now. But it should in no way cause panic from those in the Americas..
I think it's unlikely too that it will change it's mode of transmission. But, I have read that some of the researchers are very alarmed that it's not known how the nurses in Texas were infected, and some are not so sure that it's not already somewhat airborne.
By airborne, basically it's the ability to survive outside the body for an extended period, and the ability to be spread though mucous or coughed out ( like a flu ).
The biggest obstacle it faced was it quickly died outside the human body....... I don't think aids/HIV is present in tears or mucus....... This shit is even in urine..... It's in every bodily fluid.

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Old 10-16-2014, 06:44 PM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

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Originally Posted by rob666 View Post
Oh, so they found a vaccine that was 100% effective in animals, on a different strain than this one

Um, yeah, ok
Read it again, Robert.

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  #59  
Old 10-16-2014, 06:46 PM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

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Originally Posted by dragonhalf13570 View Post
Viruses can become airborne but it depends a lot on the target the virus attacks mainly. HIV is mainly found in the blood more than anything so it would be least likely to mutate to become airborne since what would be the point if it doesn't need to infect the lungs.
Ebola on the other hand can be found in all bodily fluids (blood, saliva, vomit,...etc.) and since mucus covers many of our tissues like our lungs it can essentially survive within the droplets so it doesn't have to worry about air exposure. Of course you just have to be within sneezing distance, but it has more of an obvious path to follow to become ariborne than HIV. Everytime ebola infects a person, it mutates in some way so by random chance, one mutation in the right gene can cause it to become airborne.
It's highly unlikely though, but we've never had an ebola outbreak this severe and because it has infected so many people, it has mutated a lot more than it has in past outbreaks. If it does mutate to become airborne, the virus itself will also become much weaker as a result ( so I've been told).
Not an expert on the subject, but my boyfriend is an immunologist and he knows a lot more about this sort of thing than I ever could. I've always found ebola to be fascinating and frightening at the same time.
The knowledge is much appreciated, especially since you're boyfriend is an immunologist I'm sure you have heard good incite.

The two main things I've taken away from what you said are what I made bold. The likelihood that this virus could mutate to become airborne is highly unlikely and if it somehow did, it would become more like an Ebola flu.

Could you ask your boyfriend to come share some of his knowledge on here with us about it?

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  #60  
Old 10-16-2014, 06:48 PM
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Re: Ebola in Dallas, Texas

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Originally Posted by mr black View Post
Read it again, Robert.
What part am I missing? 8.2 million dollars for a vaccine that hasn't been tested on humans yet, that was effective against the Zaire strain in Guinea pigs....... Please, help me out

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