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Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear 

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  #21  
Old 08-20-2011, 11:46 AM
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'mum the Bear is Eating Me'

Quote:
distraught mother listened on a mobile phone as her teenage daughter was eaten alive by a brown bear and its three cubs.

Olga Moskalyova, 19, gave an horrific hour-long running commentary on her own death in three separate calls as the wild animals mauled her.

She screamed: 'Mum, the bear is eating me! Mum, it’s such agony. Mum, help!'

Her mother Tatiana said that at first she thought she was joking.

'But then I heard the real horror and pain in Olga’s voice, and the sounds of a bear growling and chewing,' she added. 'I could have died then and there from shock.'

Unknown to Tatiana, the bear had already killed her husband Igor Tsyganenkov - Olga’s stepfather - by overpowering him, breaking his neck and smashing his skull.

Olga, a trainee psychologist, saw the *attack on her stepfather in tall grass and reeds by a river in Russia and fled for 70 yards before the mother bear grabbed her leg.

As the creature toyed with her, she managed to call Tatiana several times during the prolonged attack.Tatiana rang her husband - not knowing he was *already dead - but got no answer.

She alerted the police and relatives in the village of Termalniy, near Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy, in the extreme east of Siberia.

She begged them to rush to the river where the pair had gone to retrieve a fishing rod that Igor had left.

In a second call, a weak Olga gasped: 'Mum, the bears are back. She came back and brought her three babies. They’re... eating me.'

Finally, in her last call - almost an hour after the first - Olga sensed she was on the verge of death.

With the bears having apparently left her to die, she said: 'Mum, it’s not hurting any more. I don’t feel the pain. Forgive me for everything, I love you so much.'

The call cut off and that was the last Tatiana heard from her *daughter.

Half an hour later, Igor’s brother Andrei arrived with police to find the mother bear still devouring his body. Badly mauled Olga was also dead.

Six hunters were sent in by the emergency services to kill the mother bear and her three cubs.

The double killing is the latest in a spate of bear attacks across *Russia, as the hungry animals seek food in areas where people have *encroached and settled on their former habitat.

A weeping Tatiana said that Olga had everything to look forward to, and was happy with her life and boyfriend Stepan.

'My daughter was such fun. She was so cheerful, friendly, and warm,' said Tatiana.

'She had graduated from music school, and just days before the bear attack she got her driving *licence.'

Her husband and daughter are due to be buried today.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...bear-cubs.html

not a good way to go

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  #22  
Old 09-14-2011, 11:32 AM
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Re: Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear

Was about to post this thread too but realised it will have definately been covered so just submitted it in here:
Quote:
'Mum, the bear is eating me!': Frantic final phone calls of woman, 19, eaten alive by brown bear and its three cubs

Stepfather was also killed in the brutal attack

By Will Stewart

A distraught mother listened on a mobile phone as her teenage daughter was eaten alive by a brown bear and its three cubs.

Olga Moskalyova, 19, gave an horrific hour-long running commentary on her own death in three separate calls as the wild animals mauled her.
She screamed: 'Mum, the bear is eating me! Mum, it’s such agony. Mum, help!'

Her mother Tatiana said that at first she thought she was joking.

'But then I heard the real horror and pain in Olga’s voice, and the sounds of a bear growling and chewing,' she added. 'I could have died then and there from shock.'

Unknown to Tatiana, the bear had already killed her husband Igor Tsyganenkov - Olga’s stepfather - by overpowering him, breaking his neck and smashing his skull.

Olga, a trainee psychologist, saw the *attack on her stepfather in tall grass and reeds by a river in Russia and fled for 70 yards before the mother bear grabbed her leg.

As the creature toyed with her, she managed to call Tatiana several times during the prolonged attack.Tatiana rang her husband - not knowing he was *already dead - but got no answer.

She alerted the police and relatives in the village of Termalniy, near Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy, in the extreme east of Siberia.

She begged them to rush to the river where the pair had gone to retrieve a fishing rod that Igor had left.

In a second call, a weak Olga gasped: 'Mum, the bears are back. She came back and brought her three babies. They’re... eating me.'

Finally, in her last call - almost an hour after the first - Olga sensed she was on the verge of death.
With the bears having apparently left her to die, she said: 'Mum, it’s not hurting any more. I don’t feel the pain. Forgive me for everything, I love you so much.'

'Mum, it’s not hurting any more. I don’t feel the pain. Forgive me for everything, I love you so much.' The call cut off and that was the last Tatiana heard from her *daughter.

Half an hour later, Igor’s brother Andrei arrived with police to find the mother bear still devouring his body. Badly mauled Olga was also dead.

Six hunters were sent in by the emergency services to kill the mother bear and her three cubs.

The double killing is the latest in a spate of bear attacks across *Russia, as the hungry animals seek food in areas where people have *encroached and settled on their former habitat.

A weeping Tatiana said that Olga had everything to look forward to, and was happy with her life and boyfriend Stepan.

'My daughter was such fun. She was so cheerful, friendly, and warm,' said Tatiana.

'She had graduated from music school, and just days before the bear attack she got her driving *licence.'
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz1Xw8prXsN

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  #23  
Old 09-14-2011, 03:46 PM
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Re: Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear

I'll say again, beautiful young lady.

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Old 09-14-2011, 04:36 PM
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Re: Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear

i've been hiking and camping most of my life, fishing and backpacking for several years, and i am still not scared to go out. i've had four mountain lion encounters that went well for me, and one coyote encounter that was also not a problem. bears do make me wayyyyy more nervous, but i spent a whole summer working in a scout camp where bears were an almost everyday occurrence.

my job was outpost director and i did two or three overnights a week two miles outside of camp. at least a quarter of those 20 hour overnights i spent alone cooking, and cleaning the campsite before/after the boys and their leaders arrived/left. i always knew when bears were in the meadow because the jays alerted on them. it was because i kept my site completely clean that bears never associated us with food, and we never had problems. i helped the directors and wranglers track the mountain lion we had a problem with, and when coming across bear scat pointed out that there were no food or candy wrappers in it. which means that our camp was very clean. we did have to shut down the outpost for the mountain lion, she was nursing two cubs 75 ft from our corrals and wranglers.

the biggest problems occur when animals become habituated to human presence.

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Old 09-14-2011, 10:20 PM
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Re: Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear

Two things you should consider when going camping...




Or maybe this


One gets you this:


And this:


And this:


While the other gets you this:


And even this:


Story below:

THE LONGEST MINUTE
Doug White
September 16, 2006

We all have read about or seen movies entitled, ‘The Longest Day’, ‘The Longest Yard’, or The Longest Mile’. Well, I am going to tell you about “The Longest Minute” of my life.

Reed Thompson and I had been hunting hard for five days. The day was Thursday, September 7, 2006. The weather had turned from beautiful sunny skies to gale force winds and the blasting rain that comes with fall storms. Never has the weather dictated hunting time to us, so out we ventured into the Alaska bush. Not seeing a single bull for several days, we decided to hunt an area downstream that had always produced one.

Late in the evening, we were walking down a raised half mile long finger of ground that was full of grass and alders. This turf was slightly higher than the swampy tundra on either side of it. We had slogged across the swamp as quickly as possible, during a sudden deluge, to get to the downwind point. Our hope was that our passage would not be observed with the sudden increased wind and rain. About halfway down the finger, Reed turned to me and said, “I think there is a moose up ahead. It looks like two white sticks in the grass. It would surprise me if it was not a moose.” I glassed the area about one hundred yards ahead and to the left. With Reed’s help, I zeroed in on the two white sticks and watched them for several minutes. With the slightest movement, the two sticks transformed into a white paddle and then back to the two sticks. The bull had moved his head ever so slightly.

I moved my scope out to ten-power and focused in on the two white sticks as Reed moved about ten yards further down the high ground. Then as Reed focused on the white points, I moved to his location for a better shot. Reed began moving toward our quarry as I watched for movement though the scope. With nothing solid or high enough to rest my rifle on, I was forced to aim free-hand. When Reed had taken a few steps, I saw the horns rock to the right and then back to the left. The big boy then stood up and was looking directly our way. Even with the forty mile an hour winds blowing directly at us, he sensed our presence. I squeezed off a round from my Browning .338 and felt good about the shot, but the bull took two or three steps to my right and disappeared out of sight behind some alders. Reed could still see him and shouted, “Do you want me to shoot him?” I yelled back at him to go ahead because I did not want the bull running too far. I heard his shot as I was scrambling forward to get a better look. After a thirty yard hustle, I was able to see the huge fellow still standing. I put another shot into him and watched him drop. We both hesitantly, but with great excitement, approached this giant and realized that he was dead. This was a mature bull with a beautiful rack and the biggest body mass I had ever seen. The fun was definitely over; now, the real work was ready to begin. After consulting the GPS, we noted that we were a half mile from the slough and boat. It was decided that both of us should return to the boat to discard unnecessary items and return with the gear needed to prepare and pack out the meat. We placed red and blue handkerchiefs high in an alder bush so that the sight could be located from the adjacent high ground. This was the easiest half mile hike of the day. I was pumped up and excited beyond explanation.

At the boat, we left our heavy rifles. We gathered our pack frames, game bags, ropes, and knives. After Reed repositioned the boat, to compensate for the upcoming low tide, I asked him, with hand signals, if he remembered to get the handguns. He did not understand my award winning charade performance, but I let it pass after observing his revolver strapped to his chest.

Upon returning to the moose, we were hot, sweaty, and wet. The rain had abated for awhile, so we removed our rain gear and hung them in a small tree about five yards perpendicular to the moose’s belly. Reed removed his revolver, hung it on a branch opposite his jacket, and brought to my attention that it was hanging there.

With darkness approaching, we decided on removing the top front and rear quarters, tie them to our pack frames, gut him out, and then roll the behemoth over to cool through the night. We would return in the morning to finish up. Two non-spoken traditions when hunting are: whoever pulls the trigger 1) does the gutting and 2) hauls the horns out of the woods. After removing the two quarters, it was time to remove the internal organs. After cutting, tearing, and ripping, I had removed all but the heart and part of the esophagus. Darkness was settling in pretty fast and I could barely move my arms. At this point, Reed said that he would trade places with me. Instead of moving up behind the moose, I just scooted to the rear leg area and watched Reed crawl up inside the gut cavity. After a couple of cuts the ordeal was over. As Reed pulled the heart out and tossed it behind us, a loud “HUFF” snapped us to our feet. Turning around, we saw standing before us, on his hind legs a large, chocolate brown grizzly bear. The next minute seemed to last an eternity. The term surreal is so over used, but the next minute was dreamlike, bizarre, fantastic, and unreal.

The bear was standing next to the tree where the pistol was hanging. We both started shouting and waving our arms back and forth, as we moved somewhat to our right, toward the tail end of the moose. The bear came down off his back legs, onto all fours, and started circling to his right — toward the head of the bull. My only thought was to get to the gun so that we could scare him off. I sensed that he charged us from the head of the moose as I broke for the gun. Reed commented later that the bear vaulted over the moose and went straight for him. Halfway to the tree, I tripped on a fallen log and went down on all fours. From my peripheral vision on my right, I saw the bear going after Reed, who had moved into the tall (5 foot) grass. It appeared that the bear had knocked Reed down and was standing over him. My worst fear was that my friend was being mauled. I did not know how I would get him back to the boat and then home.

I grabbed the holster but was unable to remove the revolver, regardless of how hard I tugged. As I looked up, I saw the bear charging toward me. I started backing up as I continued screaming and hollering at the bear. I was frustrated that the pistol would not break free from the holster. With the bear almost on top of me, I fell over another log. I did a back drop and felt him grab my left leg. His huge head was above my lap, just out of reach of my holstered club. I tried to hit him with the pistol but a crazy thought entered my mind that I could scare him into thinking I was going to shoot by waving it back and forth. Unable to remove the pistol from the holster, I tried to shoot through it, but the strap held the hammer down on the single action revolver. Just when I thought all was lost, the bear rose up, pivoted 90 degrees to his left, and was gone. The grizzly had charged back in the direction of Reed as he had jumped up and yelled once again. Later, Reed stated that he had seen the bear knock me down and thought he was mauling me. The thought entered his mind that he was toast. He was alone in the grass with no weapon. I was down and I had the gun. When the bear started moving toward him, Reed dropped back down into the low wallow area where he had fallen during the initial charge. Reed saw the bear’s face about a foot from his own. He could hear the bear trying to sniff him out. At that point, the bear stood up, pivoted to his right, and charged back to me.

When Reed distracted the bear from its attack on me, I had time to concentrate on the holster. I saw a buckle with a strap running through it. I could not figure out how it held the gun in place, so I grabbed the buckle and attempted to rip it off. To my surprise, the buckle was actually a snap and the strap peeled away. As I pulled the revolver out, a sudden calm came over me, and I knew everything would be fine. I looked in the direction of Reed only to once again see the bear charging at me. He was about ten feet away coming up and over the initial log that I had tripped over. That was when I pointed the revolver and fired at center mass. The .44 magnum boomed in the night and the boar fell straight down, his head three feet away from where I stood. As he fell, he bit at the ground and ended up with a mouthful of sod. I stood in a dumbfounded stupor. I had no expectation that the pistol would kill the bear. My hope was that the shot would sting the bear and help scare him away along with the flame and loud report. As his head sagged to the ground, I shot him three more times in quick succession, out of fear and anger.

Author Doug White

Reed Thompson

My next sensation was hearing Reed’s voice ask if the bear was dead. I answered, “Yes”. He then yelled at me to save the rest of the rounds because we still had to walk out, and he did not have any more bullets with him. The minute was over. We hugged each other for a long time, before packing out the two quarters.

I will let you geniuses decide which type of camping equipment makes more sense. A cell phone so you can call your loved ones while a wild animal has you for lunch or something that will make it possible for you to return to your loved ones. You figure it out.

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Old 09-14-2011, 11:53 PM
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Re: Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear

How very sad!! I cannot imagine being that mother.

I see however, that they hunted down the mother bear and her cubs. I think that is tragic as well.

Everyone lost on that day.

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Old 09-15-2011, 03:18 PM
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Re: Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear

It's not right that they killed the Mother and Cubs they were just doing what Bears do when someone's in their territory

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Old 09-15-2011, 07:17 PM
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Re: Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear

once a bear or cat has had a human meal, they will go back for more. they have to be put down.

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Old 09-15-2011, 11:46 PM
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Re: Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear

Quote:
Originally Posted by daughterothenight View Post
once a bear or cat has had a human meal, they will go back for more. they have to be put down.
More bullshit. It doesn't matter. The real point should of been clear. When you go camping, GO ARMED. You are a human. Soft, weak, small teeth that have trouble biting through a walnut, fingernails that would never even break skin with two legs that can't even outrun a kitty cat much less a pissed off bear. If you refuse to arm yourself then you are encouraging this sort of tragedy. Animals can sense these sort of things by your own behavior.

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Old 09-16-2011, 12:09 AM
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Re: Calling Mom As Eaten by Bear

yada yada yada. . . do you hike, camp, backpack, fish, or hunt? do you even target shoot? have any idea how difficult it is to shoot a charging animal? your best bet is to not carry bait, to be very aware of your surroundings, and get out of the area when you recognize they are around.

these men chose to hunt late in the evening, and go back for their meat at dark. in bear country. they made choices that brought a predator directly to them.

when i hike, backpack, camp or fish, i minimize the risk for encounters. i know how to behave outdoors, how to pack my food and clean up, and not to scent myself. and when i have had encounters i knew how to back out without antagonizing the animal or looking like prey. i'm 51 and i haven't been eaten yet.

it's not that i am against being armed, i wouldn't mind having a gun, i love shooting. i use to be very good at it. as a PTSD Vet, i'm not allowed to purchase or own. the biggest reason though, is that i just recognize their limitations, and i feel an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

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